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Education

  • Shelby County School Board: New calendar is approved, school will be out May 30

    It’s official; the Shelby County Board of Education approved a recommendation to move the last day of school back one week to May 30.

    After an unusually harsh winter caused forced the district to take 13 snow days, the end of the school year had been pushed back to June 6, instead of the originally scheduled May 21.

    But adding only six days back to the original school calendar still gives the district plenty of time to meet the state’s educational requirements.

  • It’s official: tax rate remains flat

     

    The school tax rate for the 2014-15 school year will remain unchanged for a second straight year.  During Thursday’s regularly scheduled Board of Education meeting, the board voted to maintain the rate of 71.5 cents per $100 of assessed value, the same it has been for the last two years.

  • SCHS principal ready to retire

    Having served in the education field for 32 years, Shelby County High School Principal Eddie Oakley says he’s ready to start a new chapter.

    Though he has enjoyed the journey, Oakley said it’s time to retire and explore different paths.

    “I don’t know what I’m going to do yet,” he said. “Its just time to do something else.”

    Oakley said he might use his free time to flip houses or visit his son in Australia.

  • Area educators come to Shelby to Think

    More than 70 educational leaders from Kentucky convened at the former Southside Elementary gymnasium Monday for the kickoff of the fourth Thinking Strategies Institute hosted by the district.

    “The institute really has them put themselves in the stance as a learner,” SCPS staff developer Lora Shields said.  “Once you understand that, then you know how to set up your classroom to help students understand.”

    Ryan Allan, the district’s public relations coordinator, expanded on the purpose of the 4-day workshop.

  • The line between privacy and protection

    When it comes to student searches, at what point do school personnel cross the line between the school’s rights to protect and the student’s rights to privacy?

    While it is true that authorized school employees have the right to search students without consent, one Shelby County High School father believes the district crossed the line between protection and invasion and is performing random searches without justification.

  • Collins senior named National Merit semifinalist

    The Shelby County Board of Education commended Elizabeth McGuire on Thursday, for her achievement in being selected as a semifinalist in the 2015 National Merit Scholarship Program.  McGuire, a senior at Martha Layne Collins High School, is one of only 16,000 semifinalists selected from the 1.5 million applicants to the program and is the sole semifinalist in the district.

    “It’s a major honor,” SCPS public relations coordinator Ryan Allan said, noting his pride in her achievement.

  • Breaking social walls at lunch

    Schools across the county will be mixing things up at the end of the month, when they will be asked to step out of their comfort zones and sit at a different table for lunch.

    What may seem like a small task can have an enormous impact, Superintendent James Neihof explained.

    “When students interact with those who are different from them, biases and misperceptions can fall away,” he said.

  • Local firm earns international safety recognition

    The engineering consulting firm of Biagi Chance Cummins London Titzer Inc. (BCCLT), along with the University of Kentucky, was recognized last week at the Secured Cities Conference in Baltimore for their implementation of their innovative security project for the campus.

    Global security, risk and emergency management professionals from around the world competed for the top honors for security initiatives for cities, educational campuses, health care facilities and mass transit.

  • Turning everyday moments into learning opportunities

    Tuesday evening, a group of 25 parents, grandparents, caregivers and children attended the Born Learning Academy, a free program sponsored by the United Way and Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky.

    The six-session program is designed to assist busy parents and caregivers in preparing their little ones for kindergarten by teaching them how to turn everyday moments into learning opportunities.

    The two-hour program included dinner – spaghetti, salad and breadsticks – which was provided by the school’s cafeteria.

  • Business briefcase: Sept. 5 , 2014

    Taste & Tunes

    is Monday

     

    The Shelby County Chamber of Commerce will host its annual Taste & Tunes event from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at the Shelby County Fairgrounds. Tickets for the 28th annual Taste are $20, and children under 12 are free. For more information on tickets or sponsorship packages, contact the chamber at 633-1636.

     

    Joining Money Concepts