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Education

  • Back to school: Students welcomed and ‘ready to go’

    Shelby County Public Schools had another clean opening day on Wednesday, welcoming both new and returning students.

    A few traffic issues, largely because of long car-rider lines at elementary schools, slowed down the procession of students, but issues were few and far between. There were a lot of tears and smiles from new kindergartners and their parents, but the district was largely incident free.

    New kindergartner Zoie Bradley, who showed up for her first day at Wright Elementary, was smiling broadly but wouldn’t quite commit to being excited.

  • Shelby County School Board: New school projects, college readiness up for discussion

    The Shelby County Board of Education will get the school year started with a busy agenda at Thursday’s meeting.

    The board will hear several reports, including an update on both the Northside and Southside new school projects.

    The board approved the submission of the Northside Early Childhood Center construction documents to the Kentucky Department of Education at its meeting July 26 but requested seeing a the exterior design again.

  • Shelby County schools fired up and ready to go

    Collins and Shelby County high school principals John Leeper and Eddie Oakley, respectively, got the district’s teachers fired up in the Collins gym Tuesday morning with a roller-coaster competition.

    Each principal led a side of the gym in roller-coaster-like movements, complete with cheers and screams, all getting them prepared for the opening day today, which will likely be filled with plenty of cheers and screams from students.

  • New school year to bring a few changes

    As students try to stuff in late nights, parties and few more trips to the pool during the final five days of summer vacation, the Shelby County Public Schools employees are hard at work getting everything ready for teachers to report on Tuesday and students on Wednesday.

  • Shelby County School Board: AP students may get a pass on MAP

    The Shelby County Board of Education had several discussions that looked toward the future of Shelby County education during Thursday’s meeting at the board offices.

    As the district’s staff has worked to put together college readiness standards from elementary school to graduating seniors, the district has been looking for several ways to make sure students are reaching those benchmarks.

    One tool they use is the Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) tests, and another is through ACT scores.

  • Shelby ACT scores rise, but more work needed

    Shelby County Public Schools got some good news this week with the release of their 2012 junior class ACT scores.

    The district saw improvements in three of four testing categories — English 17.7, math 18.8 and reading 19.1 — with students falling short only in science, from 19.2 in 2011 to 19 in 2012.

    The district still lags the state’s averages in English, 18.4, and science, 19.1, but surpassed the state in reading, 19, and was even with the state in Math at 18.8.

  • Shelby County School Board: 3-year MAP analysis shows scores increasing

    Shelby County Public Schools is seeing some promising trends as it continues to compile more data from the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) tests.

    Lisa Smith, the district’s chief academic officer, presented a 3-year comparison to the school board during Thursday’s meeting.

  • Shelby County School Board: Wright Elementary looking for another principal

    District officials and the Wright Elementary Site-Based Decision-Making Council are going to have to scramble to fill the principal’s position at Wright.

    Bethany Groves, who had been an assistant principal in Jacksonville, Fla., was hired in early May, but on Sunday she alerted the district that she was resigning the position, which started on July 1, citing family concerns.

  • Zaring named teacher of the Year

    Sally Zaring (center), of Shelbyville, a first-grade teacher at Painted Stone Elementary, is presented with the Teacher of the Year Award by WKYT-TV personnel Amber Philpott (left) and Chris Bailey, after being nominated for the award by Lynn Whitaker, the grandmother of one of her students. The award is given each year by Morehead State University. Teachers do not have to be an alumnus.

  • Shelby County School Board: Neihof receives nearly outstanding evaluation

    The Shelby County Board of Education approved its 2012 evaluation of Superintendent James Neihof, for the third consecutive year giving Neihof an evaluation with an average rating of Excellent.

    The evaluation, which had been delivered in closed meeting on June 14 but were required to be approved in Thursday’s public meeting of the board, focused on 10 professional standards and considered the goals for the district agreed upon by Neihof and the board last year. The rating range is Unacceptable, Needs Improvement, Good, Excellent and Outstanding.