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Education

  • Teachers want to send deaf student on DC trip

    Since West Middle teacher Kelland Garland started the Presidential Leadership Program in 2009, he has been on the lookout for students to invite into the program.

    Although some cannot attend because of conflicting schedules, Garland doesn’t let that stop him from inviting those students on the group’s trip to Washington D.C., during spring break.

  • Southside, other low-scoring schools working to improve

    About one month removed from the state’s announced scores in the first year of Kentucky new assessment system, districts and individual schools are beginning to understand their scores more clearly.

    Shelby County’s overall district score was a little better than the middle of the pack statewide, falling in the 56th percentile and four schools earned proficient classifications, ranking in the 70th percentile or above in the state.

  • Shelby County School Board: SCPS gets clean audit

    Shelby County Public Schools received another nearly perfect audit, earning the best opinion possible from the independent auditors at Mather & Company, CPA.

    “There were no significant deficiencies in the accounting practices,” Brandon Hardy told the board. “There are three different opinions we can offer, and Shelby County earned an unqualified opinion. That may not sound like the best, but it is. It is a clean audit.”

  • Shelby County Public Schools: Southside update, audit to be reviewed

    With the Northside Early Childhood Center now under way, the Shelby County School Board will continue to move forward with plans for the new Southside Elementary.

    At its meeting on Oct. 25, the board approved the plans to be sent to the Kentucky Department of Education and, when accepted, for the bidding process to begin. The bids were originally scheduled to be opened on Nov. 29.

  • Northside Early Childhood Center: Residents skip meeting but will hear noise

    Shelby County Public Schools invited the public on Thursday to attend an informational meeting on the development and plan for the new Northside Early Childhood Center, which will be built on the site of the old Northside Elementary School at 821 College St. in Shelbyville.

  • Neihof on test scores: ‘We are challenged’

    The Next-Generation Learners, the first component of the state’s new educational accountability system shows that the state, by its own measures, Needs Improvement.

    Begun for the 2011-12 school year, the evaluation combines standardized and end-of-year test results in a complex formula for evaluating each school in the state, and eventually it will include accountability measures for teachers and administration, as well.

    Results for Shelby County Public Schools show much the same as the state’s: improvement is still needed.

  • Contractor sues SCPS about settling issue

    Shelby County Public Schools has been named in a lawsuit filed by T+C Contracting, a Louisville-based construction firm, for withholding payment for work done on Collins High School.

    The suit is based on a construction problem that occurred in the summer of 2009 when the floor in the east hallway of the school settled 3 inches, after the completion of the school.

  • Shelby County School Board: Career Academy nearing its preview

    Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof reported to the school board Thursday that the district is nearing completion of its Career Academy plan and hopes to present it by mid-winter to give students, parents and schools time to prepare for its implementation next year.

    The academy will be similar to the accelerated academy, giving students focused on the workplace after graduation a path to excel and be more marketable.

    Neihof highlighted several areas, which include:

  • Shelby County School Board: MAP results are mostly up

    The fall MAP testing scores for Shelby County Public Schools showed big improvements at nearly every level when compared to last fall’s test scores and those from the past several years – and fell way short when compared to last spring.

    Those somewhat conflicting findings from the Measures of Academic Progress test were discussed at Thursday night’s meeting of the Shelby County School Board.

    Those tests, which are administered three times each year, showed:

  • Shelby County School Board: Newest MAP test scores will evaluate summer program

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hear a report on the district’s first round of MAP testing during its regular meeting on Thursday.

    The session will be at 7 p.m. in the district’s offices at 1155 Main St. in Shelbyville.

    The Measures of Academic Progress tests are given three times each year – once each in the fall, winter and spring ­­– to gauge progress. The fall tests can be used to judge a student’s progress from one year to the next and set the baseline for growth in the same school year.