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Education

  • Zaring named teacher of the Year

    Sally Zaring (center), of Shelbyville, a first-grade teacher at Painted Stone Elementary, is presented with the Teacher of the Year Award by WKYT-TV personnel Amber Philpott (left) and Chris Bailey, after being nominated for the award by Lynn Whitaker, the grandmother of one of her students. The award is given each year by Morehead State University. Teachers do not have to be an alumnus.

  • Shelby County School Board: Neihof receives nearly outstanding evaluation

    The Shelby County Board of Education approved its 2012 evaluation of Superintendent James Neihof, for the third consecutive year giving Neihof an evaluation with an average rating of Excellent.

    The evaluation, which had been delivered in closed meeting on June 14 but were required to be approved in Thursday’s public meeting of the board, focused on 10 professional standards and considered the goals for the district agreed upon by Neihof and the board last year. The rating range is Unacceptable, Needs Improvement, Good, Excellent and Outstanding.

  • Shelby County School Board: Superintendent will receive public review

    The Shelby County Board of Education will make its review of Superintendent James Neihof public at Thursday’s meeting.

    In accordance with state law, the board met with Neihof in closed session during its meeting on  June 14, discussing with him its preliminary evaluation.

    At this week’s meeting, which will be in the district’s offices, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville, the board will present those discussions to the public.

    Neihof, who was hired in 2008, has received very positive reviews in the past two years.

  • Shelby County School Board: MAP reading scores hit 75 percent for end of year

    This school year ended with three-fourths of Shelby County grade school students reading on or above grade level – or you might say that 25 percent left school for the summer lagging behind.

    That was the gist of the latest MAP (Measures of Academic Progress) report by Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith told members of the Shelby County School Board at their meeting Thursday night.

    The board, including Superintendent James Neihof, expressed disappointment that those numbers were not higher.

  • Willhoite to fill Shelby's final principal opening

    Shelby County Public Schools has filled its fifth and final opening for principal.

    Kim Willhoite, a reading recovery specialist at the Kentucky Department of Education, will take over this fall at Clear Creek Elementary, joining new principals at Heritage and Wright elementaries, East Middle School and Collins High School as SCPS sets its leadership roster for the fall.

    Willhoite, for one, said she thinks she will bring a unique perspective to her new role. She was born in Korea but was adopted and raised in Georgia and Kentucky,

  • Collins teams leads 4 at Odyssey world finals

    Shelby County Public Schools sent four teams to the Odyssey of the Mind World 2012 World Finals at Iowa State University in Ames last month.

    Competing against teams from all over the world in different creative problem-solving categories, the teams from the county fared very well.

    Collins High School’s squad competing in the To Be or Not To Be problem had the highest finish among those from the county, placing 15th in the high school division.

  • Shelby County Public Schools: Collins, Heritage get new principals

    Shelby County Public Schools added two new principals to the ranks this week, with J.J. Black leaving Painted Stone to take over at Heritage and John Leeper being hired from Carroll County High School lead Collins High School.

    As principal at Carroll County, Leeper saw the school become one of 40 Bronze Medal Schools, as recognized in U.S. News and World Reportmagazine.

    But he won’t stop there with his new school.

  • With last step, Shelby’s seniors ready to take on the world

    Nearly 450 seniors took the first step toward their futures Saturday as Collins, Cornerstone and Shelby County schools held their graduation ceremonies.

    But these students seem more than ready to meet the challenges of the world, not to mention college, considering 237 SCHS seniors, 187 Collins seniors and 9 Cornerstone seniors earned about $3 million in scholarships, grants and awards.

    Amid the popping flashes, the crying parents and cheering friends and siblings was the admittance, and sometimes reluctance, of the upcoming change for these seniors.

  • Focus of final day in school: Learning, service

    Shelby County Public Schools wrapped up the school year with the controversial last day of school Monday.

    The day, which was originally planned to be Friday but was pushed to Monday because of one snow day during the winter, was much maligned, with many believing the district should have cancelled it.

    However, that was not an option, but many argued that the last day of school didn’t include instruction and often was  wasted, and school board member Sam Hinkle also posed that question with the calendar change was proposed in late March.

  • Commencements commence Saturday

    Although Saturday will be filled with graduation parties, gifts and cards, there won’t be any graduation ceremonies that day.

    Because Shelby County Public Schools still has one more day of school left on Monday, this weekend will be commencement ceremony weekend instead of graduation weekend. Diplomas will have to wait until after Monday.

    However, the schools are still abuzz with activity, commencement practices are filling afternoons Thursday and today, and hotels are booked.