.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • 3 Shelby teams make Odyssey world finals

    Shelby County schools had 15 teams qualify for the state Odyssey of the Mind competition last weekend at Northern Kentucky University, and three of them took home championships to advance to the world finals in May at Michigan State University.

    “It was great. We had one team at each level advance, and we had another five teams finish in third place, just missing qualifying for the world finals,” said Teresa Walther, the Talented and Gifted teacher for East and West middle schools.

  • Shelby County School Board: Last day for school: May 22

    Students at Shelby County Public Schools should plan to attend school for an extra couple of  days in May after missing classes for two snow days this winter.

    If there are no more school cancellations, SCPS will add two days to the school year, pushing the end of the school year back to May 22.

  • Shelby County School Board: Collins students will run for Beta Club national office

    The Shelby County Board of Education’s meeting on Thursday was the site of a national announcement.

    Collins junior Ryan Ruff, who was elected state Beta Club President and will serve his term next year, announced his intentions to run for president of the national organization.

    “I’m here today to formerly announce my intentions for the candidacy of the national president,” Ruff told the board.

    Ruff, the son of Dan and Liz Ruff, was actually at the meeting to talk about his candidacy for the state president.

  • Kentucky Legislature: Bills designed to make schools safer

    In the wake of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., both the Kentucky House and Senate are moving forward with similar school safety bills.

    House Bill 354 unanimously cleared the House Education Committee on Thursday and will go to the floor for consideration.

  • Shelby County School Board: District-wide accreditation to be pursued

    The Shelby County School Board heard on Thursday a report from Shelby County High School Principal Eddie Oakley and district Director of Elementary Schools Cindy French on the AdvancED Accreditation program, which the district is planning to follow.

    SCHS is the only accredited school in the district, earning the distinction in 2008-09 school year, Oakley’s first as principal.

  • Shelby County School Board: Southside funding approved

    The Shelby County Board of Education and Finance Corporation approved during its meeting Thursday the funding for the new Southside Elementary School.

    Because school districts are not allowed to carry debt for more than one year, the board’s Finance Corporation must issue the bonds, with a 1-year lease agreement, for the exact amount of the annual bond payment, and the lease agreement automatically rolls over each year.

  • Shelby County School Board: Sams excited for first meeting

    When the Shelby County Board of Education meets tomorrow at the district’s offices, new member Karen Sams said she will be ready to get involved quickly.

     “I’m excited, and really looking forward to receiving a budget,” she said. “I’ve already taken some training through the KSBA’s [the Kentucky School Boards Association] online leadership institute. It was very good for first-time board members, and there’s already another training session set up in February.”

  • School district is dark in shutdown

    If Shelby County Public Schools buildings look even darker than usual this week, it’s because they are.

    For the first time, the district has instituted a furlough week for administrators during the holiday break. This cost-saving measure that allows the district to save on administration salaries and on utility bills at the schools by dropping the energy consumption to the lowest levels possible.

  • Louisville company hired to build Southside Elementary

    The Shelby County School Board Thursday voted night to award the construction project for Southside Elementary School to a Louisville company with which the board has worked on previous projects.

  • Economics lesson turns into community outreach

    The fourth-grade teachers at Heritage Elementary School wanted to put together a program to teach their students about economics.

    So teachers Sarah Beth Gomelsky, Kristen Hart and Devon Scrogham put together a unit where the students purchase raw materials, create an item and then sell those items on the “open market” at school.

    The students created bracelets and necklaces out of yarn and beads out of beeswax, and sold them to the student body for one week before school.