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Education

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – ATC expansion to broaden Career Villages

    The Shelby County Board of Education got a sneak peak of the district’s modern education tactics on Thursday when Assistant Superintendent Kerry Whitehouse and Tommy Hurt, the district’s chief information officer, gave a report on 21st Century Support Systems, the fifth strand of the Strategic Leadership Plan.

    While the district’s one-to-one computing plan calls for each high school student this year to receive a digital device, the district has still not been able to secure funding.

  • Kentucky among highest graduation states

    Kentucky schools now rank among the highest in the country for graduation rates, according a report from the U.S Department of Education.

    With an 86 percent graduation rate for 2012-2013, Kentucky tied with five other states and falls just behind eight others.

  • Shelby County Board of Education – Draft budget ready for review

    In December, the Kentucky Board of Education announced that there would be a reduction in state’s SEEK funding. The state has not yet released the decrease amount, but district Superintendent James Neihof said the district is anticipating a one percent drop.

    Thursday the Shelby County Board of Education will review the 2015-16 draft budget when the board convenes at the district offices at 7 p.m., at the district offices. 1155 Main Street, Shelbyville, but Neihof said the draft is just the first step of three in preparing the budget.

  • Ammunition found at Collins

    Phone alerts went out earlier this week to many parents across the district after ammunition was discovered at two Shelby County schools.

    The Shelby County Sheriff’s Department is investigating the discovery of empty shell casings found in the hallway at Collins High school.

    Deputy Ray White, Collins High School Resource Officer, said he was unable to share any information regarding the investigation but did say he felt it was “nothing dangerous, nothing earth shaking.”

  • Corpus Christi stays afloat

    After nearly shutting down a year ago, Simpsonville’s Corpus Christi Academy is still hanging on and may soon be stronger than ever.

    Since their downfall, many changes have since been made, including a reversal of roles regarding administrative leadership.

    Former principal and co-founder Phyllis Sower, stepped down from her position this year to return to teaching and taking her seat in the principal’s office, Leslie Genuis, a former teacher at the academy.

  • District to budget after state funding cuts

    Shelby County Public Schools will need to tighten their belt soon, as the district is expected to lose more than $72,000 in state funding, according to the Kentucky Department of Education.

    This spring, districts across the state will be slapped with cuts to their Support Education Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK) payments.

    The funding, which is provided by the state on a per pupil basis, has been declining since the 2008 recession.

  • SCPS teacher earns math program honor

    Clear Creek Elementary math intervention teacher (MIT) Stephanie Herndon was honored last week for her progress in a program provided by the Kentucky Center for Mathematics to improve mathematics education.

    NKU President Geoffrey Mearns honored Herndon, along with 12 other MITs in the region, with the Northern Kentucky University Trailblazer Award for Mathematics Education at the Embassy Suites in Lexington.

  • Practice makes perfect

    After six attempts, Collins High School senior Ryan Renfro earned a perfect score of a 36 on the American College Test this past October.

    Renfro took his first ACT exam in 7th grade as part of the Duke TIP program, and scored a 24, which is better than the state and district average, which are both just about 19.

    He then took the test five additional times in high school, earning a 33 two times and a 35 twice before finally reaching the perfect 36.

  • Shelby County School Board – Survey TELLs all

    When the Shelby County Board of Education convenes Thursday at 7 p.m. at the district’s offices, 1155 Main Street, Shelbyville, the board will hear an update on the district’s responses to the 2013 TELL (Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning) Kentucky Survey.

    In March of 2013, all school-based licensed educators in the state were provided with an access code to anonymously provide answers to an online survey regarding conditions at their school.

    The results were complied to review the school conditions at the school, district, and state levels.

  • Institute challenges teachers to rethink

     

    This week, educators from six districts in the state attended a Thinking Strategies Institute hosted by Shelby County Public Schools.

    Approximately 70 teachers and administrators from Shelby, Franklin, Tremble, Henry, Spencer and Gallatin counties spent four days learning about thinking strategies, visiting lab classes in Shelby County that are currently implementing thinking strategy skills, and putting their knowledge into action.