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Education

  • Learning their fair share

    When the bell rang at Southside Elementary School Wednesday afternoon, eager learners suddenly flooded the hallway.  With smiles and conversation, they switched classrooms seeking their next learning opportunity.

    Those classroom seats were not occupied antsy elementary students, but rather excited educators, eager to learn about innovative technology tools being used by other teachers across the district.

    The perplexing sight of teachers behind the desks, as well as leading the classrooms, was part of the district’s second Ed Tech Share Fair.

  • Pruitt starts town hall meetings in Shelby

    Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt made Shelby County his inaugural stop Monday evening as he kicked-off a series of Town Hall Meetings at the Blair Center.

    The freshly remodeled former Southside Elementary gymnasium was packed with educators, concerned parents, grandparents, board members and public officials, among numerous others hoping to have their voices heard.

    Pruitt asked attendees to consider five questions when making their address:

    What do you expect from our schools?

    What school characteristics are most important?

  • Board looks at the ‘Big Picture’

     

    Board members say they want to see the ‘big picture’ concerning an alternative education system that could replace the current structure at the Education Center at Cropper.

    Several board members who attended Big Picture High School in Nashville earlier this year said they were interested in hearing more information on bringing the first Big Picture school to Kentucky.

    The format would involve students attending school three days a week and working at an internship the other two.

  • SCPS recognized for CCR improvement

    Shelby County Public Schools is one of 111 school districts in the state that has been recognized for its College and Career Readiness improvement.

    “Shelby County had a goal for at least fifty-four percent of our high school students to graduate college and career ready in 2015. In reality, seventy-one percent graduated ready as measured by the Unbridled Learning Accountability model,” SCPS public relations coordinator Ryan Allan explained.

  • Titans give back, get back

    Sitting quietly in a circle, peering up with admiration, a class of young Southside Elementary students listens eagerly to Collins’ senior Sarah Donnell read them a book, their attentive silence breaking only on occasion to laugh at her funny sound effects and gestures.

  • Shelby teen building a cultural bridge

    A local youth is making big strides for the Hispanic community and her work has recently earned her an impressive recognition.

    Ivonne Gonzales, an Eastern Kentucky University sophomore, has been honored with the University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Student Leadership Award for her efforts to educate others about, and promote the inclusion of, Hispanic culture.

  • Hats off to reading

    Children will be coming home from school this week with Wockets in their Pockets, Green Eggs and Ham in their tummies and hopefully a newfound love for reading in their hearts.

    On this day 112 years ago a man by the name of Theodor Seuss Geisel was born and would become one of the best-known children’s authors of our time, writing more than 60 books under the famous pseudonym Dr. Seuss.

    The late author’s unique and wildly tales of imaginary worlds and characters made his stories both interesting and iconic. 

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – Board discusses goal progress

    Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith gave an update Thursday at Shelby County Public Schools’ regularly scheduled board meeting on the district’s progress toward meeting their board goals for the 2015-16 school year.

    The goals are tied to the Strategic Leadership Plan, Smith explained.

  • Shelby County produces 2 Merit Finalists

    This year Shelby County has the honor of recognizing not one but two, National Merit Finalists.

    Raley Suter of Collins High School and Emma Saarinen of Shelbyville and a senior at the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky in Bowling Green at Western Kentucky University, have advanced to Finalist standing in the National Merit Scholarship Program.

  • Bevin’s proposed budget slashes could harm JCTC and beyond.

    Addressing a deficit of more than $30 billion in Kentucky’s pension fund, Governor Matt Bevin proposed some budget cuts in his State of the Commonwealth budget address late last month that could be a major blow to public postsecondary institutions.

    If approved by the legislature, Bevin’s spending plan would cut funding to postsecondary institutions by 4.5 percent for the remainder of the fiscal year and by 9 percent for the biennium.

    While many see that as cuts at our major universities, it will hit home as well.