• Big Picture Learning gives district an alternative to alternative education

    Shelby County Public Schools recognizes that not all students fit the same learning mold. So the district is considering the possibility of launching the state’s first Big Picture School.

    With nearly 100 schools around the globe participating, the program redesigns education in the United States.  With their innovative approach to learning, the program has a 92 percent graduation rate.

  • Straight from the horse’s mouth

    Pumpkins patches, pizza baking and a talking horse don’t typically have much in common, but last week at Gallrein Farms, they all came together to make a unique and fun classroom setting.

    “It was really nice to have the class,” Sarah Flattery, a second grade teacher at Heritage Elementary said.  Flattery and her students along with three other second grade classes attended a field trip to Gallrein Farms on Thursday and this year, in addition to touring the farm, students were treated to a special agriculture program.

  • SCPS rolls out student computers

    Nearly every Shelby County Public Schools high student will be spending their weekend tinkering with a new Chromebook, thanks to the district’s commitment to pair every student with their own device by 2018.

    On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday students at both high schools piled into the halls and herded from station to station before finally picking up their Chromebook after much anticipation.

    Some stations took a bit longer than others to pass through but inevitably, all students left with smiles on their faces and devices under their arms.

  • PSE fitness equipment unveiled

    Getting kids excited about their physical fitness is not always a simple task, but representatives from Project Fit America made it look easy Friday afternoon at Painted Stone Elementary School as students screamed, cheered and clapped for the unveiling of their new fitness equipment.

    PFA, a national public charity, is an organization with a goal of supporting sustainable opportunities for kids to be active, fit and healthy.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – Board to consider working budget

    The Shelby County Board of Education will vote on the working budget for the 2015-16 school year when they meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at Central Office, 1155 West Main Street.

    The board voted without discussion in June to approve the tentative budget, which included small changes from the Draft Budget that was presented in January.

    The first rendition of the 2015-16 budget included total revenue of $57.55 million, and that number was increased to $57.63 million with changes in June.

  • Board clears up graduation requirements

    As the district requires students to be college or career ready to graduate, some parents have recently expressed concern about those tracks and how their children can achieve CCR status.

  • Not all in favor of drug testing students

    While there was no public opposition voiced in the meetings leading up to the school board’s decision concerning a drug testing pilot program, parent Rick Markle said he strongly disagrees with the board’s decision to approve the program last month.  Thursday, during their board meeting, Markle claimed the program steps on his toes as a parent and violates his daughter’s right to privacy.

  • District ACT scores on the rise

    Shelby County Public Schools administration was pleased with improvements seniors recorded on ACT results posted for the 2015 graduating class.

    The report took into account that students were able to retake the exam on multiple occasions throughout the year, after taking it as juniors, as required by the state.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD–District to discuss new graduation expectations


    Those concerned about the new graduation requirements may find some solace Thursday when the Shelby County Board of Education meets for their regularly scheduled meeting at 7 p.m. at Wright Elementary School, 500 Rocket Lane.

    John Leeper, Director of Innovation and College and Career Readiness for the district, will present an overview of the Petition for Graduation, which will provide a breakdown of a different pathways students may pursue if they are unable to achieve the district’s new graduation standards.

  • Barely scratching the Surface

    In 2015, you would be hard-pressed to find a clichéclassroom with a teacher standing at a blackboard, monotonously repeating a textbook lesson.

    Educators now understand that students learn best through collaboration, group work and hands-on lessons.

    To support this innovative method of learning, schools across the nation are tossing out the pencils, papers, textbooks and folders and upgrading to tech-friendly classrooms, integrating 1:1 technology initiatives.