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Education

  • Collins hosts successful VEX competition

    Hundreds of competitors and their supporters flooded the auditorium at Collins High School Saturday for one of the state’s largest VEX Robotics Competitions.

    Coaches Tim Oltman and Shane Ware said 71 teams from across the state turned out for the district’s largest and the state’s third largest VEX competition since the program came into existence more than a decade ago.

    “Five to six hundred people attended,” Oltman said.  “Shelby County teams did really well.”

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Committee recommends 4 percent tax increase

    The Shelby County Board of Education gathered with members of the budget committee for a formal work session during its regularly scheduled meeting Thursday and learned their recommendation included a two percent teacher raise. The proposal, however, was a double-edged sword as it accompanied the recommendation of generating those funds by increasing the county’s property tax by the maximum four percent rate.

    Rates can be increased by more, but would require a public vote, not just action by the school board.

  • Shelby teams face off in academic competition

    Elementary schools across Shelby County competed in district competition of the Governor’s Cup over the weekend and two Shelby schools brought home top honors.

    The district event at Clear Creek Elementary saw Wright, Simpsonville, Southside and Clear Creek compete.  There the Simpsonville Bobcats came out on top.

  • Kindergarten start dates pushed

    Some parents gearing up to send their little one to kindergarten in the upcoming school year might have to hold off on their school supply shopping for another year.

    Starting this coming school year, children must be five years old on or before Aug. 1 to enter kindergarten.  Previously, the cutoff was October 1.

    In 2012, however, the General Assembly changed the law with the mindset that younger students may not be ready for kindergarten.

    That law is set to go into effect for the 2017-18 school year.

  • Hold the phone

     

    Shelby County’s Jillian Jacobs, along with four classmates at Capital Day School in Frankfort, are in the running for national recognition for a phone app designed to help feed the hungry.

    The team was recently selected as Best in State and Best in Region winners in the fifth annual Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge for a mobile app concept “Waste Free America.” For the honor, the team received a $5,000 award from the Verizon Foundation for their school and tablets for each team member.

  • Blanketing the community

    Warming bodies, warming hearts: That’s the tagline for Blanket Louisville, the non-profit organization that Kathy Fehder and her husband, Steve, started 13 years ago. 

    And when Fehder jumped on board as principal of Corpus Christi in June she brought with her that warming hearts attitude that quickly radiated through the halls of the small, independent school in Simpsonville.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Budget first look shows deficit

    The Shelby County Board of Education took its first peek at the budget for the upcoming fiscal year and learned that starting with a deficiency could be likely.

    District Director of Finance Susan Barkley presented to the board the draft budget for Fiscal Year 18 (the 2017-18 school year), the first step in the budgeting process, and said they anticipate about $250,000 more in expenditures than in revenues at this point.

  • Lockdown prompts procedural changes

    After a request from police, several Shelby County schools were placed on lockdown last week following reports of shots fired in the area of Rocket Lane – where Shelby County High, the Area Technology Center, JCTC, Wright Elementary and East Middle schools are located.

    And while no shots were fired on school grounds and the incident was cleared in less than one hour, the precautionary lockdown while police searched for the suspects left many questions from parents and guardians of students at the schools.

  • How did SnoGo go?

    With the district’s first two non-traditional instructional, SnoGo, days in the rear view mirror, it’s apparent the model was not the picture of perfection.

    The district announced earlier this year that on the first snow day that would normally close school buildings, students would participate in SnoGo, instead.  By completing assignments from home on these days, students would avoid making up the day later in the summer.

    After months of planning and preparation, the first SnoGo day finally arrived Thursday, and followed on Friday.

  • SHELBY COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS: School calendar has big changes

    The Shelby County Board of Education approved Thursday an entirely new calendar format for the district for the 2017-18 school year, which includes longer breaks but earlier start times.

    After careful consideration, the district’s calendar committee’s formulated three calendars to present to the community for their input and voting.