• Stretching the Red Ribbon

    Wright Elementary School Talented and Gifted (TAG) students are participating in a national campaign to spread awareness of drug abuse, and they hope to earn some goodies along with way.

    Last month, schools across the nation participated in various activities, programs and assemblies in recognition of Red Ribbon Week.

    The week is a part of the Red Ribbon Campaign, a campaign organized by National Family Partnership to create drug awareness.

  • Substitute teacher looks to press charges against student

    Officials with the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office have confirmed that a case has been forwarded to the Shelby County Attorney’s office concerning an altercation between a student and a substitute teacher that took place at Collins High School earlier this month.

    However, the substitute teacher Bryan Schildknecht said he is the one looking to press charges.

    Schildknecht said the student verbally and physically assaulted him prior to a questionable shoving quarrel unfolding –a portion of which was recorded on a student’s cell phone.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – Student board representatives to be introduced


  • Diving into science

    Shelby County students sank their teeth into their schoolwork this week as fourth graders at both Wright and Clear Creek elementary schools dissected and examined the spiny dogfish shark.

    As sort of their own version of Shark Week, the dissection was preceded by art projects with shark themes, shark lessons and a day of external examinations.

    Wright Elementary science teacher Billy Betts said the external examination day gives students the chance to become more relaxed and comfortable with the shark before they cut into it the following day.

  • Are substitute teachers ready for classes?

    A violent scuffle between a substitute and a student at Collins last week has raised concerns regarding the experience and training required of substitutes.

    Last Thursday, substitute teacher Bryan Schildknecht attempted to shove a student in an aggressive manner following an alleged verbal altercation between the two.

    The district has remained tight-lipped regarding the situation, saying only that the matter is under investigation and that Schildknecht would no longer sub in the district.

  • Collins’ teacher, student altercation under investigation

    District officials are remaining quiet about a physical altercation that broke out in a classroom last week at Collins High School between substitute teacher Bryan Schildknecht and a student.

    Unconfirmed reports say the altercation began with a verbal exchange but district officials say what exactly led to Schildknecht lunging at, grabbing and shoving a student remains under investigation.

  • Shelby County Public School: District to dig deep into K-PREP scores

    The Shelby County Board of Education will get a full breakdown on the district’s Kentucky Performance Rating for Educational Progress [K-PREP] scores at Thursday’s regular meeting, scheduled this week for the Shelby County Area Technology Center, 230 Rocket Lane in Shelbyville.

    The district received its scores last week and while the overall district score was Proficient, for the first time the district had two schools reach Distinguished scores.

  • Simpsonville, Collins earn district’s first Distinguished scores


  • SCPS budget shows several changes from earlier draft

    Susan Barkley, SCPS director of finance, shared with the board Thursday the working budget for the 2015-16 school year and the district is looking a bit unbalanced.

    “The working budget expenditures exceed the receipts by about five hundred thousand dollars,” Barkley said.

    She noted that a little more than $300,000 of the expenditures in the more than $64 million General Fund budget is a result of a carryover from the previous fiscal year’s budget.

  • Big Picture Learning gives district an alternative to alternative education

    Shelby County Public Schools recognizes that not all students fit the same learning mold. So the district is considering the possibility of launching the state’s first Big Picture School.

    With nearly 100 schools around the globe participating, the program redesigns education in the United States.  With their innovative approach to learning, the program has a 92 percent graduation rate.