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Education

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD: Three lanes could extend to Rocket Lane

    If you often find yourself inconvenienced by traffic along U.S. 60 at Shelby County High School, you may be glad to hear that a solution is in the works.

    The Shelby County Board of Education will consider allowing the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to purchase a small portion of their property and grant a temporary construction easement at Thursday’s regularly scheduled meeting at Shelby County High School, 1701 Frankfort Road, Shelbyville. The property is part of the state’s planned expansion for the road.

  • Grant helps JHS curb violence

    With an objective of curbing bullying and dating violence in Shelby County, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville will use nearly $290,000 in grant funds to support the Green Dot and Safe Dates programs, which are aimed at reducing the number of students who are threatened, attacked or hurt.

    These programs will provide education to students in the community on bullying, as well as the knowledge to identify aggressive acts and skills to reduce the number of incidents.

  • District prepares to go digital

    Chief Operations Officer Eddie Oakley presented to the board of education Thursday an update regarding the details for the distribution of 2,000 Chromebooks to all ninth through twelfth grade students in the district.

    Oakley said they are anticipating deploying the devices around the beginning of October.

    In the meantime, he said, the district is getting everything in order to ensure the devices are ready for student use.

    Preparing them for distribution –cataloging, coding, and imaging every device– will take around two weeks.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD: Drug testing program to include eighth graders

    The Shelby County Board of Education has elected to include eighth graders in the district’s pilot program for the athletic drug testing.

    Director of Student Services Dave Weedman shared with the board during Thursday’s regular meeting the details of the drug-testing program that the district’s plans to pilot for the 2015-16 school year and board members were displeased that the younger students were omitted from the eight-page draft.

  • An excited return

    With warm sunshine and hardly a cloud in the sky, Wednesday was a picturesque day for children to return to school.  And with bright smiles and warm hugs the attitudes of students and faculty members appeared just as ideal as the weather.

    Shelby County Public Relations Coordinator Ryan Allan said the positive energy was evident.

    “Just the enthusiasm across the district almost feels different this year,” he said, noting the beautiful weather may have been a factor.

  • Swim schedule sinks coach

    After a summer of heated negotiations proved futile, the Shelbyville/Shelby County Parks and Rec. system settled on a swim practice schedule that has left some up in arms and two high school swim teams without a coach.

    J.P. LaVertu has reluctantly resigned from the position as swim coach for both Shelby County and Collins high schools.

    “Due to some scheduling conflicts with his work schedule it basically made it impossible for him to do morning practices,” said Collins Athletics Director Randy Fawns.

  • Linking classes

    It was a day of new experiences for many at Collins High School Monday as Mike Clark addressed a room of young students as principal for the first time.

    “You are going to have some freedoms that you wouldn’t necessarily have enjoyed in the middle schools, but you are also going to have some [higher] expectations,” he said.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – District to discuss drug testing details

    The Shelby County Board of Education will discuss the implementation of a recently approved drug testing pilot program for athletes when they convene Thursday at 7 p.m. at the district offices, 1155 Main Street, Shelbyville.

    The board voted unanimously to approve a one-year pilot of the program in May in an effort to ease peer pressure for student athletes.

  • Expanding knowledge

    As students across Shelby County pour into their classrooms next week, a young school will welcome its inaugural class of first grade students.

    Discovery Gym, located at 116 Main Street in Shelbyville, has expanded its building and is broadening the curriculum to include first graders for the first time since opening in 2012.

    “We opened up [in] July three years ago and we started out with morning preschool just a couple days a week and gymnastics in the evening,” said Discovery Gym owner and teacher Laura Shelton.

  • The cost of education

    Back-to-school shopping is a financially plaguing problem for many. So last month Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof suggested parents restrict their supply list spending at $25.

    And while the cap is helpful, it is just a drop in the bucket for many parents when it comes to back-to-school shopping, which is now considered the second largest spending season next to the winter holidays.