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Cops & Courts

  • A Killer Goes Free Part 3: Shock probation started in Ohio, around '60s

    Ohio, in 1965, was the first state to initiate a shock-probation program, which it calls “judicial release.”

    The recidivism rate refers to committing a crime after release from incarceration, and for Ohio, that rate is higher than in Kentucky.

    The latest rate released by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections, which tabulates recidivism rates on a 3-year cycle, was 38 percent, compared to 33.3 percent for Kentucky’s latest figures.

  • Man deported 6 times after illegally entring country sentenced to prison

    An undocumented citizen living in Shelbyville was sentenced Tuesday to 38 months in federal prison for entering the United States illegally for the seventh time.

    U.S. District Judge Danny C. Reeves handed down the sentence to Raul Estrada-Chavez, 32, for illegal re-entry after deportation.

    On March 2, Estrada-Chavez was arrested by Kentucky State Police Trooper Trevor Harris for various traffic violations, including no operator’s license.

  • Shelby County Grand Jury Indictments, Sept. 23, 2011

    Tracy Hardin, 37, of 318 Midland Boulevard was indicted for making false statements, misrepresentations/failure to report change in order to receive public assistance benefits.

    Jeremy Delbridge, 27, of 385 Flat Creek Road in Frankfort was indicted for receiving stolen property over $500.

    Marica L. Payne, 24, of 84 Illinois St. was indicted for intimidating a witness in a legal process and fourth-degree assault.

    Jacob A. Nieman of 81 County Lane was indicted for receiving stolen property.

  • A Killer Goes Free Part 2: Judge who released woman who killed baby is familliar with shock probation

    In October 2010, the lawyer for Tonya Nicole Brown, in prison for delivering a full-term baby and leaving it to die, petitioned Senior Judge Steven Mershon and asked him to release Brown under the state’s shock probation program.

  • EARLIER: Man sought in robbery at Simpsonville bank

    Police are asking for the public’s help in locating a  man who got away Thursday with an undetermined amount of cash in the county’s latest bank robbery.

    At approximately 3 p.m. a man entered Commonwealth Bank in Simpsonville and demanded money from two tellers, Shelby County Sheriff’s Detective Eric Hettinger said.

    The suspect fled on foot towards Meadow Ridge Apartments, just south of the bank, where he is believed to have gotten into a red pickup truck driven by a second man.

  • Woman escapes injury in flipped car

    Amber Delong, of Frankfort, was not injured when she flipped her car on the interstate Wednesday morning.

    The accident happened on I-64 westbound at the 39th mile marker at about 10 a.m. in a heavy rainstorm.

    Kentucky State Police Trooper Frank Flowers said no other vehicles were involved in the accident, which left Delong’s car upside down on the left-hand side of the roadway.

    Flowers said the weather could have been a contributing factor in the rain.

  • Man wanted in connection with check fraud and ID theft

    Crime Stoppers is asking for information on the whereabouts of Jerry Prewitt, who is wanted for questioning by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office in connection with check fraud and identity theft.

    He is also warranted in Lincoln County, where he has an active bench warrant outstanding.

    He is described as being 28 years old, 6 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 203 pounds.

  • Craig trial set for November

    Kelly Craig, a former long-time employee  of Tracy’s Home Furnishings, who was charged with stealing thousands from that store, is set to go to trial in November.

    Craig, who was terminated from the store when she was arrested last June and was charged with stealing $5,867 from Tracy’s but in August, that amount snowballed when she was indicted on five counts of theft by unlawful taking of more than $10,000.

  • A Killer Goes Free Part 1: She was a model inmate, a ‘compliant client’

    Sentencing in homicide-related cases typically takes from two to three years, and many offenders are usually in custody most of that time.

    Tonya Nicole Brown gave birth and disposed of her child in April 2008, was charged with murder within a week, and sentencing did not take place until July 8, 2010.

  • A Killer Goes Free Part 1: Lexington woman who left her baby to die now out of prison

    On a cool spring day, April 6, 2008,Tonya Nicole Brown, nine months pregnant and feeling labor pains, entered the restroom of the White Castle Restaurant on Mount Eden Road and gave birth in a stall to a baby girl with dark, curly hair.

    She placed that healthy baby inside a plastic garbage bag, tied that bag at the top, placed it in a trash can and walked out of that public restroom, less than 200 feet from the safe haven of a fire station.