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Business

  • New book covers 2011 in Shelby County

    The work product of photographer Greg Biagi’s year of roaming the events and capturing the people of Shelby County is about to become public.

    Shelby County, Kentucky 2011 – A Living History, a new book from veteran Shelby County publisher William E. Matthews, is headed to the press and should be available shortly after Memorial Day.

    Matthews said in a press release announcing the book’s completion, that this  9 x12, full-color, coffee-table book contains approximately 750 photographs by Biagi.

  • Building permits: March 16, 2012

    AAPER’S, 1101 Isaac Shelby Drive, canopy, 576 square feet, $35,000
    Samples Custom Archery, 728 Frankfort Road, sign, 16 square feet, $80
    Roberta Moore, 8000 Bagdad Road, storage building, 130 square feet, $3,000
    Georgia Browning, 1038 Pleasureville Road, addition to garage, 204 square, $700
    Pentecostal Church, 39 Matthew Young Road, add to church, 2,160 square feet, $23,500
    AKL Custom Homes, 506 Foxwood Ct., house, 3,376 square feet, $150,000
    Temple Homes Inc., 4004 Patricia Dr., house, 2,517 square feet, $130,000

  • New Business: Gone Fishing Guide Service

    Address: 7901 Mount Eden Road, Shelbyville

  • Shelby’s beef prices jumping

    If you’re a cattle producer, things are looking up, experts say.

    Corinne Kephart, who heads up the animal science and horticulture department at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension office, said cattle prices are really looking good right now.

    “Right now, cattle prices are really good compared to last year,” she said. “A decrease in cattle production out West because of a drought has really driven prices up.”

  • Shelbyville shuffles continue

    Fresh from Shelbyville's Main Street earning accreditation from the National Trust Main Street Center, those doing some window-shopping will see changes.

    Although some changes will bring about new items and new looks, others will leave some empty spaces.

    Magnolia Salon and Spa, at 804 Main Street, and the Shelbyville Antique Market, 524 Main Street, are both closing because of personal reasons. Magnolia will close at the end of the month and the antique market within two to three months.

  • Business Briefcase: March 23, 2012

    Passport employee’s award

    to benefit OVEC’s Head Start

    Marcelline Coots, one of the first individuals to be hired at Passport Health Plan in 1997, has been named the 2012 Making A Difference award winner by the Association for Community Affiliated Plans (ACAP), and that’s going to benefit the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative’s Head Start program.

  • Real Estate deeds: March 23, 2012

    Feb. 1-12

    Nadene Starrett Mason Estate, William D. and Jeannie Mason and Melinda L. Stoess,  to Amber N. and Charles R. Stoess III, property on Clarks Station Road, $10 and considerations

    Thompson Real Estate Holdings LLC to Melissa and Christopher Thompson, Tracts 3A-1, Shelburne Farm, $158,000

    James and Karla Ferguson to Brad and Shari Thompson, Lot 130, Rolling Ridge, Phase 4, Section 1, $132,500

    Forever Communications Inc. to Capcity Communications LLC, property on U.S. 60, $15,000

  • New Business: Sixth Street Print House

    Address: 414 6th St. Shelbyville

  • Fiesta Mexicana serves up expansion

    Fiesta Mexicana, one of Shelbyville’s most popular and enduring downtown restaurants, is in expansion mode.

    The sounds of drills, hammers are constant and obvious to passersby as workers gut the space at 616 Main Street, just west of the restaurant, to expand the dining room and broaden the restaurant’s front.

    That could be good news for downtown, because that particular front, which previously had been a bar, is considered an ugly metal façade that has been an eyesore for years.

  • Big parcels are big sales in Shelby County

    The availability of land acreage is rising along with land prices across Shelby County.

    Fewer and fewer people are applying to have their large farming parcels subdivided, instead opting to sell the large-acre farms instead.

    "Crop prices have been really good, especially with grain and soybeans, so farmers are looking to get more ground," said Shawn Willard of H. Barry Smith Realtors and Auctioneers. "It just makes more sense to buy now with prices high, and it's becoming harder and harder to lease land.