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Business

  • Insuring the love

    Kindness is a simple word but those involved with The Kindness Revolution know actions speak louder than words.

  • Hilltop for sale

    After more than a dozen years of operating Hilltop Produce and Garden Center, owners Gerald and Sandra Stucker say they are ready to sell the business to focus on enjoying the fruits of their labor.

    The couple of 33 years said they have owned and operated the local produce store at 305 Frankfort Road for 13 of those years because they “needed something to do.”

  • Planet Fitness coming to Midland Center

    Rumors have been stirring for some time regarding the former Winn-Dixie building at 120 Midland Boulevard.  But officials with STCPF, LLC, the Kentucky-based Planet Fitness franchisee, have confirmed that the 42,000 square-foot-building in the Midland Center will soon be home to a new Planet Fitness location, one of more than 1,100 nationwide.

  • Music to the ear

    Farmers in Shelby are pleased with how corn is coming along, but say that other crops that aren’t as water-loving have been suffering from too much wet weather.

    “Today, we’ve been out in the fields looking at the corn, most all the corn crop that we have is looking really good,” Shelby County farmer Kevin Smith said, referring to yellow field corn.

  • Goodwin departs chamber

    Shelley Goodwin, president of the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, is vacating her position for a new role as a workforce development coordinator.

    Goodwin said the newly established position has been in the works for a number of years.

  • Booming bee biz

    There’s been a boom in the beekeeping business and Pat Hornback, a veteran in the field, said the peaked interest is a good thing.

    “One-third of our food is dependent on pollination,” she said, noting that pollinators need to be protected.  “We’re happy about the hype.  It brought beekeeping to the forefront and people are trying it.”

  • “There is no way to actually replace her,” Scott Moore, publisher

    After today, there will be a big void at The Sentinel-News with the retirement of a longtime employee that everyone considers as dear as a member of their own family.

    Publisher Scott Moore paused when speaking about Sharon Warner, an employee of 44 years, whose title of senior production specialist doesn’t begin to encompass all that she does at the newspaper.

    “We’ll find somebody to fill that role, but there is no way to actually replace her,” he said. “She’s a tremendous employee.”

  • ATC program earns national recognition

    The National Institute for Metalworking Skills recently announced the accreditation of the Computerized Manufacturing and Machining Program at the Shelby County Area Technology Center.

    Formed in 1994 by the metalworking trade associations to develop and maintain a globally competitive workforce, NIMS sets skills standards for the industry, certifies individual skills against the standards and accredits training programs that meet NIMS quality requirements.

  • Shelby Hardware out of business

    Shelby Hardware, formerly Mr. Hardware, located on Midland Trail next to Speedway, is no more.

    The store’s owner, Ron Manno, was not available for comment, but the owner of the building, Matthew Andrews, owner of Andrews Pharmacy, the other business that occupies the front of the building, said the hardware store closed in April.

    “They just went out altogether,” he said. “I think they just kind of got tired. They didn’t have a terrible business, but they weren’t making as much money as they used to.”

  • Retail heating up

    With temperatures lingering in the 90s, summer is heating up and so are the some summer-related retail items.  Rural King assistant manager Kim Matthews said they have been selling tons of fans and lawn-related items.

    She said sales have remained high.

    Sales may not be so hot across the map, however. CNNMoney reported that retail sales in June fell .3 percent from May. This data, they noted, is surprising because April and May were also both slow retail seasons, despite the expectation that sales would bounce back after a slow winter.