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Business

  • Shelby not involved in new state program

    As a new statewide program consisting of an internship program between students and manufacturers takes off around the state, Shelby County has found itself on the outside looking in. But local officials are setting the ground work to get involved in the program.

    “This is our third recruitment class, so the idea is, we’re growing it, and we feel like in another year or two, there will be that need to expand it out to Shelby County,” said Debbie Anderson, who heads up the Kentucky FAME Greater Louisville Chapter.

  • Tanks removed at Swifty Oil Station

    Swifty Oil Station, vacant since June 2015, has undergone still another transformation with the removal of its gas tanks this week.

    Justin Phelps with Hagan Real Estate confirmed that the property, located at 1530 Midland Trail in Shelbyville, will soon be under new ownership, but said he cannot speak to the plans for the facility.

  • Housing market dips a bit last year

    In 2016, the county broke its 3-year trend in increasing home sales, with a slight dip.

    However, that picture is not completely gloomy – the total number of homes sold was down 2 percent but the number of people building new homes increased slightly, with 5 more residential building permits taken out than in 2015 for an increase of 3 percent. In addition, the average home price fell only slightly, at 2 percent.

  • Donations needed for Backpack Program

    The Shelby County Backpack Project is once again in need of food, and the latest drive to help is being held by Kentucky Farm Bureau.

    Debbie Rothenburger, who is heading up the effort along with Stephanie Tucker, said that Food Check Out Week, a national movement by KFB, will be held locally Feb. 19-25.

    “This food check out week, Feb. 19-25, that's when we celebrate how many weeks it takes for the average American to earn enough money to buy food for the entire year,” she said. “It's like six weeks in America.”

  • Plans afoot for pedestrian, bike pathways

    The crowd that met at the Stratton Center Tuesday night to give input on a proposed plan for bike and pedestrian pathways for the county was small, but eager to contribute.

    “We are from Brassfield subdivision, and we’re interested in getting a clear path to the park,” said Carmen Beste, who studied maps of the area along with her husband Richard.

  • Right to work law in force

    There hasn’t been much time yet for workers or employers to determine the effects of Kentucky’s new right to work law, which Gov. Matt Bevin signed Jan. 8, officials say, but union leaders and lawmakers share opposing views of the future repercussions.

  • Kotheimer retiring after 4 decades

    Dr. Anita Kotheimer is a familiar face around Shelby County, and she very well should be after practicing medicine for nearly forty years.

    But now, at age 65, she says she is ready to take down her shingle, with plans to retire at the end of this month.

    “I’ve probably stayed as long as you can stay in medicine after thirty-six years of service,” she said with a chuckle.

    Since her latest contract is now up, she does not want to renew it because that would put her working into age 70.

  • Gables growing

    If tenants have been waiting for someone else to test the waters at the recently redeveloped Shoppes at Blue Gables, they can comfortably dive in now.

    Shelby Preservation Group president Kerry Magan said about 20 potential tenants have come through to look at the spaces and the first units have been rented.

    “Our first tenant was Parkside Realty, locally represented by Jacob Gurney.  Jacob has been most helpful in publicizing the venue on Facebook.  He occupied the premises on January first,” Magan said. 

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION Shelby gaining new restaurant

    Though several fast food restaurants recently have developed second locations in the county, the community has long voiced a desire for new options.  Their cries may at last have been heard. 

    On Tuesday, during the regularly scheduled 6:30 p.m. meeting at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington St. Shelbyville, the Triple S Planning commission will consider the development plan for Bojangles’ along Taylorsville Road on Mortown Way and Old Brunerstown Road in Shelby County, near the recently developed Taco Bell and Tractor Supply.

  • Industrial climate heating up

    As 2017 gets underway temperatures may be cooling down but industry in Shelby County is hotter than ever and Libby Adams, executive director of the Shelby County Industrial & Development Foundation, said the economic forecast for the year looks to stay hot.

    “We had lots of industries that either expanded or finished an expansion last year,” she said.  “It seems like all of the industries are stable and growing.”

    As we reflect upon the past 12 months, there’s no doubt Adams’ observation is on point.