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Business

  • Larry Rogers named new MUW campaign chair

    Members of the Shelby County Metro United Way team say it is with great pleasure they announce Larry Rogers as their new campaign chair for 2017.

    Roberta Steutermann, senior regional community giving manager for Metro United Way, said she is so excited to work with Rogers at the helm of the campaign this year.

    “This year we really thought about who we wanted and everybody at the table all agreed that who we wanted was Larry Rogers,” she said, noting his connections and respect in the community run deep.

  • Prom can be a pretty penny

    Between purchasing tickets, dinner, hair, makeup, nails, flowers, photography and a limousine rental, the cost of attending prom can get pricey even before the cost of a dress and the accessories are taken into account.

    According to Promgirl, you can expect to spend between a few hundred and up to a few thousand for the special night.

    In fact, a survey from Visa noted in 2015 that parents spend an average of $989 on their daughters and $893 on their sons to attend prom.

  • New medical practice offers fresh approach

    Dr. Laura White, a pediatrician of 10 years in Shelby County, has opened a new medical practice called Future Hope Total Health.

    The practice, which opened in January, is located in the same building as her pediatrics practice, Future Hope Pediatrics, at 231 Midland Park in Shelbyville, with a staff of three, herself, her son Austin, as administrator, and her husband, Mark, as health coach and personal trainer.

    Mark White said he wanted to clear up some confusion about the status of his wife’s two practices.

  • Crews working at burned Dollar General

    The former Dollar General Store off Boone Station Road is finally starting to buzz again.

    Not with the shoppers, but with activity finally cleaning up the mess left after a fire on Jan. 13 gutted much of the store.

    Workers in rubber gloves have been carrying out mounds of debris, while others are driving forklifts full of fire debris from the building on Mount Tabor Circle near Kroger.

  • Filing doesn’t have to be taxing

    With the confusion surrounding the possibility of delayed tax returns, tax-filing season got off to a rocky start.

    Nancy Kasey and Violeta Garner with Liberty Tax on Midland Trail in Shelbyville, confirmed that because the IRS issued a delay in releasing some refunds because of enhanced fraud protection with those claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credits (ACTC).

  • Shelby not involved in new state program

    As a new statewide program consisting of an internship program between students and manufacturers takes off around the state, Shelby County has found itself on the outside looking in. But local officials are setting the ground work to get involved in the program.

    “This is our third recruitment class, so the idea is, we’re growing it, and we feel like in another year or two, there will be that need to expand it out to Shelby County,” said Debbie Anderson, who heads up the Kentucky FAME Greater Louisville Chapter.

  • Tanks removed at Swifty Oil Station

    Swifty Oil Station, vacant since June 2015, has undergone still another transformation with the removal of its gas tanks this week.

    Justin Phelps with Hagan Real Estate confirmed that the property, located at 1530 Midland Trail in Shelbyville, will soon be under new ownership, but said he cannot speak to the plans for the facility.

  • Housing market dips a bit last year

    In 2016, the county broke its 3-year trend in increasing home sales, with a slight dip.

    However, that picture is not completely gloomy – the total number of homes sold was down 2 percent but the number of people building new homes increased slightly, with 5 more residential building permits taken out than in 2015 for an increase of 3 percent. In addition, the average home price fell only slightly, at 2 percent.

  • Donations needed for Backpack Program

    The Shelby County Backpack Project is once again in need of food, and the latest drive to help is being held by Kentucky Farm Bureau.

    Debbie Rothenburger, who is heading up the effort along with Stephanie Tucker, said that Food Check Out Week, a national movement by KFB, will be held locally Feb. 19-25.

    “This food check out week, Feb. 19-25, that's when we celebrate how many weeks it takes for the average American to earn enough money to buy food for the entire year,” she said. “It's like six weeks in America.”

  • Plans afoot for pedestrian, bike pathways

    The crowd that met at the Stratton Center Tuesday night to give input on a proposed plan for bike and pedestrian pathways for the county was small, but eager to contribute.

    “We are from Brassfield subdivision, and we’re interested in getting a clear path to the park,” said Carmen Beste, who studied maps of the area along with her husband Richard.