.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Antique mall to change ownership

    The Calico Cat Antique Mall closed Saturday, but its doors won’t be shut for long with downtown business owners Ben and Melinda Hardin taking over as the new owners.

    “It’s kind of my adopted baby,” said Ben Hardin, laughing.

    The mall, located at 524 Main St., was previously owned by Michael and Carrie Edington, who announced recently that they were leaving, he said.

  • Still in place at distillery

    The new Bulleit Distillery on Benson Road in Shelby County can now start to live up to its name, as the still was put into place last week.

    That means that the end of the year will find Shelby County in production of bourbon, said officials at the distillery.

    “At the site, the distillery is still on track to be operational at the end of 2016,” said Mark Koenig, Kentucky Operations Director for the distillery.

  • Shelby produce races to the track, area restaurants

    Restaurants at Churchill Downs are proud of their reputation for using products grown by Kentucky farmers, and Shelby’s Courtney Farms has garnered a large slice of that Derby Pie.

    “We try to use as much [local produce] as we possibly can – that’s first priority for us,” said David Danielson, executive chef for Churchill Downs.

  • Down the stretch for planning a Derby party

    What will you be doing Saturday afternoon when 20 Thoroughbreds dash from the gate at Churchill Downs?

    Chances are you won’t be hosting as many guests as there will be crammed into the stands to watch the 142nd Kentucky Derby, but you probably will have some kind of get together planned, even if it’s just having a few family and friend over to celebrate the most famous 2 minutes in sports.

  • Plans afoot for pedestrian, bike pathways

    The crowd that met at the Stratton Center Tuesday night to give input on a proposed plan for bike and pedestrian pathways for the county was small, but eager to contribute.

    “We are from Brassfield subdivision, and we’re interested in getting a clear path to the park,” said Carmen Beste, who studied maps of the area along with her husband Richard.

  • Industrial climate heating up

    As 2017 gets underway temperatures may be cooling down but industry in Shelby County is hotter than ever and Libby Adams, executive director of the Shelby County Industrial & Development Foundation, said the economic forecast for the year looks to stay hot.

    “We had lots of industries that either expanded or finished an expansion last year,” she said.  “It seems like all of the industries are stable and growing.”

    As we reflect upon the past 12 months, there’s no doubt Adams’ observation is on point.

  • Farming for Christmas

    On Thanksgiving Day, Ron Stella will be camped out on the Christmas tree farm he operates with Vivek Sarin, waiting for the first customers of the season.

    Well, not exactly the first, as the very first tree cut from the Shelby Christmas Tree Farm was taken down on Monday and will grace the grounds of the Governor’s Mansion in Frankfort, said Sarin.

  • Woodworking Maniak to open on Main

    The arguably perfect details accompanied by the vibrant colors and intricate designs of Timothy Babb’s handcrafted woodworkings are best appreciated in person. And tomorrow that opportunity to be afforded to the community when Babb officially opens the doors to his first storefront for his business, The Woodworking Maniak, at 545 Main Street.

  • Mulberry peaches on tap

    Louisville based Against the Grain Brewery, along with Ethereal Brewing of Lexington, teamed up with Shelby County’s Mulberry Orchard to introduce the first limited edition brew in their Kentucky Proud Beer Series.

    Using peaches from the local farm, the brewery team brewed a sour peach saison they have named Peach Better Have My Money.

  • Insuring the love

    Kindness is a simple word but those involved with The Kindness Revolution know actions speak louder than words.