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Business

  • Paints and promotions

    Two family businesses are taking over a space in the mirrored business center at 813 Taylorsville Road.

    KT Signs, a well-established sign and promotional item business that has been home-operated for more than twenty years, will operate out of the front of the space. But at night, his wife and her sister will take over the back, teaching others a passion they share.

    “We kind of called it the mullet because we have the business in the front and the partying the back,” Barb Helton said with a chuckle.

  • Governor’s Square continues evolution

    If you’ve noticed mounds of earth and construction cones placed all through Governor’s Square, you’re seeing the beginning stages for a new parking lot – but that’s not all.

    A new business is coming to the shopping center as well.

    Lee Webb, a commercial real estate broker who heads up Governors Square LLC, the entity that owns the shopping center situated on the corner of U.S. 60 and Mount Eden Road, said that construction would begin soon on the new lot.

  • New manufacturing job training coming in Nov.

    Jefferson Community and Technical College will begin offering free training for manufacturing jobs with a new program set to start next month.

    The four-week training classes for Certified Production Technician [CPT] will be held at the JCTC Shelby County Campus, starting Nov. 2.

  • Local NAPA assembling a regional power

     

  • Credit card changes in place

    Despite a big push to have new credit card swiping technology in place by the first of October, many storeowners in Shelby have not made that transition.

    The concern for the storeowners is the where liability will fall on data breaches as processing companies – like Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover – switch to a new, more secure card with a smartchip than those that solely feature a magnetic strip on the back of the cards.

  • Bountiful harvest

    Both state agriculture officials and local farmers agree that this year’s harvest – outside of tobacco – is looking very good, despite a dry summer.

    That’s because the crops got plenty of water early on, and as a result, state officials are really excited.

  • Bountiful harvest

    Both state agriculture officials and local farmers agree that this year’s harvest – outside of tobacco – is looking very good, despite a dry summer.

    That’s because the crops got plenty of water early on, and as a result, state officials are really excited.

  • Restaurant gets a makeover

    When Reinel Salgado realized his Shelbyville restaurant wasn’t drawing the attention it should, he decided to make a change.  Across the top of the Taylorsville Road Mexican restaurant formerly known as Salgado’s is a sign informing residents that El Nopal is taking over the spot.  But Salgado says the ownership has not changed.

    “We just changed the name and changed it to a sit-down restaurant,” he said, noting he felt it was time for a new atmosphere.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION – Humane Society to add six buildings

    The Shelby County Humane Society presented development plans to the Triple S Planning Commission Tuesday to add six additional buildings to their existing spay/neuter clinic.

    Dennis Verkamp, a civil engineer land surveyor with Biagi, Chance, Cummins, London, Titzer, Inc. explained that the development proposes six additional building on 60 acres.  Those buildings include a cat building, a dog building, an education center, a small storage building, a dog show building and potentially a barn for rescuing horses.

  • Big plans for condemned building

    An historic building that was condemned in March for minor problems could have some big plans in its future and, in the process, alter the downtown Shelbyville scene with a new restaurant.

    But that’s not all – officials at Wise Capital Management, the Shelbyville company that purchased the building known as Layson Hall on the corner of Main and 7th streets – say they also plan to restore the structure to its original state when it was built in the 1860s.