• TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION – Farm store looks to locate on U.S. 60

    A retail spot may soon replace some overgrown landscaping along Shelbyville Road west of Shelbyville.

    On Tuesday, the Triple S Planning Commission will consider a zone change request for a 16-acre property just east of Claudia Sanders on the north side of Shelbyville Road when they meet for their regularly scheduled meeting at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington Street at 6:30 p.m.

  • Sales of cool treats heat up

     As the days get hotter and longer, you’ll see more and more people screaming for ice cream, especially in July, which is National Ice Cream Month.

    And in Shelbyville there are several options to serve up scoops this summer including some new comers, like Harvest Coffee and Café, and a few tried and true favorites, like Homemade Pie and Ice Cream Kitchen and Baskin Robbins.

    Harvest Coffee and Caféis the newest ice cream player, but they feature a well-known brand in Comfy Cow.

  • Housing market moving fast

    The trend toward houses spending less time on the market is continuing; say those in the real estate arena, which bodes well for the economy.

    “There’s certainly less days on the market,” said Chuck Kavanaugh, executive vice president of the Building Industry Association of Greater Louisville, which includes the Shelby County chapter.

  • Bountiful harvest

    Both state agriculture officials and local farmers agree that this year’s harvest – outside of tobacco – is looking very good, despite a dry summer.

    That’s because the crops got plenty of water early on, and as a result, state officials are really excited.

  • Blue Gables renovations slow down

    When work began on the old Blue Gables motel last summer, officials with the Shelbyville Preservation Group, a non-profit group in charge of renovating the property for the purpose of turning it into multiple store units, said they anticipated at least some rooms would be ready by the fall of 2014.

    However, by the summer of 2015, SPG representatives acknowledged they might have been too ambitious with their timeline and said units may be closer to completion by the late summer or early fall of this year.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION: Public gets chance for input on craft brewery, distillery talks

    Per the Shelbyville City Council’s request, the Triple S Planning Commission will hold a public hearing during its regular meeting Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. concerning the addition of breweries, brew pubs, micro breweries and micro distilleries to certain districts within the city.

    The planning commission will hold the hearing at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington Street, in order to make a sufficient recommendation back to the city council.

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said a change could be a boon to the city.

  • Bell House Restaurant takes on new partner

     A new face can be seen at the Bell House restaurant in downtown Shelbyville these days.

    In May, Anderly Paller joined the team of Sue and Bob Androit, who opened the restaurant with nearly six years ago.

    Paller, who is originally from Brazil and has lived several places in the U.S., took her time before deciding to get into business with the Andriots.

  • Swifty’s swift closure leaves a hole in service

    Pumping our own gas may seem like a minor inconvenience for us in times of inclement weather, but for individuals like Glen Franklin pumping gas unassisted can be a major hassle.

    That is because Franklin, like several others in Shelby County, is confined to a wheel chair, and despite an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) that requires “gas stations to provide equal access for their customers with disabilities,” Franklin said the assistance is rarely offered.

  • Trying to beat the early heat


  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION – Plans progress for Simpsonville McDonald’s

    With a development plan approval in hand, McDonald’s is one step closer to a Simpsonville location but not everyone is loving it.

    Joe Watson with American Engineers presented the development plans to the Triple S Planning Commission Tuesday evening for the 4,490-square-foot restaurant planned for 1101 Buck Creek Road that included three waivers and three variances, several of which did not sit well with Dan Davilla, manager of The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass.