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Business

  • Chugging into expansion

    Edwards Moving and Rigging has long been known for transporting extremely large items all over the country, and now they’re adding another dimension at their location on Everett Hall Road in Shelbyville.

    Gathered in front of a newly established railroad spur, Edward’s representatives, local officials and other industry leaders held up a blue ribbon while company owner Mark Edwards ceremoniously snipped it to open the company’s new set of tracks.

  • Cooking up an American dream

    With a trailer behind his Ford truck, Moises Tejeda is chasing the American dream.

    For 18 years, he’s been working in construction, moving houses, but he’s ready for a change.

    “I’m getting old, I gotta start doing something else. [Construction] is hard on the body,” he said with a smile.

    So, Tejeda decided to lean over a hot grill, opening Taqueria la Nayarita, a Mexican food trailer, this summer. But it was the year before that his cooking flame was sparked.

  • Downtown cafe focuses on fresh, local and affordable

    A downtown cafénearing one year in business is gaining popularity for trying to help and work with its customers.

    Harvest Coffee & Café, at 524 Main St., inside Masterpieces for your Home, has instituted a Pay-What-You-Can program once a week.

    “My husband, Ben, and I began Harvest with a dream to do something different in our hometown. We’ve been thrilled with how that dream has evolved,” co-owner Melinda Hardin said.

  • Former police officer finds niche as security director at mall

    “It’s settling in nicely,” said Steve Ladden of his post as head of security at the Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass in Simpsonville.
    Ladden, 54, a Colorado native who has lived in Shelbyville for 12 years, was a police officer in Colorado Springs as well as head of security at the Citadel Mall there, so with 20 plus years of experience in the law enforcement field, he feels right at home in his new position.

  • Tobacco crop wet, but OK

    Despite a wet, soggy harvesting season, the tobacco crop is doing fairly well, according to area farmers.

    “It’s a good crop, even a big crop, but it’s wet,” said Paul Hornback, state senator and co-chair of the state Agriculture Committee who also owns a farm in the Bagdad area.

    Hornback said that wet conditions are making it difficult for farmers to dry and cure their tobacco.

    “It’s been very trying,” he said. “There have been some challenges.”

  • Business briefcase: Sept. 19 , 2014

    Nation joins

    McDaniel Insurance

     

    Amy Nation, formally of Habitat for Humanity of Shelby County, has recently joined McDaniel Insurance Agency located at 602 Main Street in Shelbyville. To contact nation, call 502-909-0920.

     

    Massie honored as Guardian of Small Business by NFIB

  • Sigma stretches to new facility in Shelby County

     

  • New dialysis clinic under construction

    Ground has been broken for another new dialysis facility in Shelbyville.

    Although the building is not going up yet, earth has been cleared for the Shelbyville DaVita Dialysis Clinic, to be located at 100 Church View St. off Mack Walters Road, just east of Village Plaza.

    The clinic, owned by Preferred Properties Partnership of Louisville, will occupy one acre of land encompassing 8,138 square feet in an area was once occupied by a nursing home.

  • Screaming for ice cream

    Ice cream lovers may be excited by a banner hanging on the marquee at Middleton Station on Midland Trail proclaiming the coming of a new Baskin-Robbins store.

    Charlie and Karen Bertram of Oldham County will own Shelby County’s first Baskin-Robbins store, and they are new to the ice cream business.

  • CVS drops tobacco products

    If you go into a CVS pharmacy and can’t find your brand of tobacco product, there’s a reason; the store stopped carrying tobacco products Wednesday.

    The entire area behind the counter in the Shelbyville location, where cigarettes and other tobacco products used to be stored, is now bare. In place of the tobacco products are now a few posters encouraging customers to stop smoking.