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Business

  • Recycling Christmas

    Shelby County Recycling Center Director Rick Solomon gestured toward a mound of holiday gift-wrap overflowing a huge container while employees scurried to unload customers’ recyclables Wednesday.

    “It’s been pretty busy this morning,” he said. “I think it would be busier still if it warms up a little, people would be getting out more. Right now, I’m sure, most people don’t want to get out in the cold.”

  • Planting a new seed

     At 21 and 23 years old, Heather and Alli Veech may be young entrepreneurs, but they are eager to tackle their dream of opening a new restaurant on Main Street in Shelbyville.

    Located in the former Harvest Coffee and Cafébuilding, Bourbon Kitchen 524 is currently under the knife, getting a makeover that will change the dining experience in terms of both aesthetics and menu options.

    “We’re going to have breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Heather Veech said. “We’ll have a full caféwith the specialty coffee drinks.”

  • Biagi’s says goodbye

    For nearly a century, business at Biagi’s Appliance has been good. But as they say, all good things must come to an end.

    So as brothers Steve and Robert Biagi wrap up the store’s 90th anniversary, they are preparing to close the doors on the family business.

    Annibale Biagi established Biagi’s Appliances in downtown Shelbyville in 1927.  The business passed through the hands of their grandfather to their father, Vincent, and uncle, Hugh, before the brother’s joined them at the helm in 1993.

  • An evolving labor force Personal care jobs growing

    As we approach Labor Day weekend and celebrate the workforce that makes our county move, it’s important to study how our workforce will need to transform through the future. While technology-based jobs will continue to evolve and grow, there are other areas our aging workforce will need.

    As the nation’s population ages, the need for workers to care for the elderly is projected to climb.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field of personal care workers is expected to climb to 27.9 percent by 2024.

  • Crackers lose zest at Kroger

    Shoppers at Kroger stores will notice that a favorite brand of saltine cracker is missing from the shelves recently.

    That’s because that Kroger is no longer carrying Zesta saltine crackers, store officials say.

    Alice Sims, assistant manager at Kroger, said that situation is more far-reaching than just the Shelbyville store, encompassing stores throughout the chain.

    She said she does not know whether the move was initiated by the store or by Keebler, the company that makes Zesta crackers.

  • Snagging safe sun spectacles

    The long anticipated eclipse is just three days away.  However, with NASA approved spectacles becoming as scarce as the top Christmas toy, chances are if you don’t already have a pair, the main event could pass right before your closed eyes.

  • Shelby man gets scholarship from distillers

     

  • Retirement rush

    It’s no secret that Kentucky has one of the worst funded pension systems in the nation, but it’s the unknown that has employees of the commonwealth so concerned.  And those concerns have many seeking retirement options a bit sooner than they may have planned.

  • Decades of devotion

    Today marks the end of an era for Don Carey who is retiring after nearly forty years with the Masonic Home of Shelbyville.

    When Carey came to work at the facility 38 years ago, he was just looking for a job, but what he found was a home, he said.

    A place where his wizardry in "fixin' everything that breaks" made him so indispensable that he rose to the rank of maintenance director, a position that didn't go to his head, but rather, to his hands.

  • Heavy-duty commitment

    A local company is making waves in the economic development sector across the state with a new apprenticeship program.

    Edwards Moving & Rigging, Inc. in Shelbyville has announced the creation of a new Transportation Apprenticeship Program that will work in conjunction with the Kentucky Labor Cabinet and the new effort could turn out to be a pilot program.