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Business

  • Reports take pulse of local industry

    Two reports on the state of industry in Shelby County -- one released by local officials, the other by the state - show companies are largely happy to be doing business here, though employers have some concerns about the quality of the local workforce.

    The Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation and the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce recently completed a survey of 41 of the county's 67 industries.

  • The 2008 legislative session: What business wants

    As 2008 quickly approaches, the Kentucky General Assembly will soon be in session with many difficult decisions to make. Gov. Steve Beshear's first budget will be under consideration, and hundreds of competing interest groups will be working to sway lawmakers' opinions. The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce will also be at the Capitol, speaking for the business community of Kentucky and hoping to improve the state's business climate for all Kentuckians.

  • Business rolls in for local company

    A local manufacturing company has recently changed its name and relocated in order to keep up with the amount of business that is rolling in.

    Scott Dixon, co-owner of Bluegrass Roller Service, said the company needed to double its manufacturing space in order to keep up with customer demands.

    Formerly Meisner Roller Co., the company outgrew its facility on Pearce Industrial Road and moved to a 20,000 foot facility on Brook Industrial Road last October - at which time the company also changed its name.

  • Steel workers, foundry at stalemate

    Union workers at a local aluminum foundry have been on and then off the picket line over the last eight months and still do not have a contract with their employer.

    And with a string of failed contract negotiations between the Untied Steel Workers and the Ohio Valley Aluminum Company, it is uncertain what will bring the two sides to a contract agreement.

    Kevin Baird, president of the USW local 1693, said the two sticking points are wage increases and union security and dues check off.

  • Passing the torch; Torrey Smith takes over dad's realty company

    Torrey Smith and his dad, W. A., believe that sometimes you have to step backwards to go forward.

    Starting Jan. 1, Torrey took ownership of the real estate firm W. A. has owned since 1979. At the same time, the company is regaining its independence. The company had been affiliated with the national real estate franchise ERA since 2002. Now it will be simply Torrey Smith Realty Co.

  • Business spotlight

    Who we are: Enhance Small Engine Repair

    Owned by: Dennis Hudspeth

    Where: 1021 Frankfort Road, inside Big-Top tobacco warehouse

    What we do: Offers service and repair to almost all small engine machines - including lawnmowers, blowers, chainsaws and ATVs. The shop also sells rebuilt and new lawn machines.

    We say: "I offer quality repair at low prices," Hudspeth said. He said he has 30 years of experience in working with small engines.

    Hours: Monday through Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  • Nifco building framed

    A local construction company has recently completed the steel framing of a structure that will house an international auto parts maker that is coming to Shelbyville next year.

    In late December, workers from R.E. Purnell Construction bolted the last beam in what will be Nifco auto parts manufacturing newest U.S. facility.

    Nifco, a Japanese auto parts manufacturer, will use the 80,000 square-foot building to make auto fasteners for Toyota, Honda and American models.

  • BINGO!

    When Arlene Self, 44, of Shelbyville hits the bingo halls, she rarely goes alone. Instead, a small, spotted dog and an angel accompany her. Both are trinkets Self carries in her "bingo bag" to bring her good luck.

    Her angel is actually a plastic figurine necklace, she explained. The dog is a Dalmatian cigarette lighter that Self inherited from her mother-in-law.

    "She always did pretty good at Bingo," she said.

  • 2007: Business year in review

    2007 was not the best of times in Shelby County, but it was not the worst of times either.

    While the county lost some jobs to the downturn in the automotive and construction sectors, it gained three new industries with the promise of more than 250 good-paying jobs in the next couple of years.

    While construction in the county slowed as the housing market contracted, the local area was spared the precipitous drop some regions of the country have seen.

  • New lawyer in town

    Name: J.R. RoBards

    Occupation: General law practice. Started private practice at Stanley-Casey House, 301 Washington St.