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Business

  • Foreclosures: 'Needlessly on the rise'

    Yolanda Bradford knows painfully too well the look on homeowners' faces when they are facing foreclosure.

    Bradford, a non-profit financial consultant, said people who come into her office with a stack of late mortgage payments often don't have any hope of saving their home.

    "They think there is no way to save their home, so many just walk away and let their house fall into foreclosure," she said.

    Bradford has seen the number of homeowners who walk away without first pursuing all of their options steadily increase in Shelby County.

  • 'Bankrupt' Goody's to stay open here

    Velda Imel is glad that the Goody's location in Shelbyville is not one of the close to 70 stores in the chain was tapped to be shut down. Imel, of Cropper, said she has shopped at the store on Midland Trail for years because of its selection and low prices.

    "It's too bad for those other stores," Imel said.

  • Downtown merchants extend hours

    Starting June 12, many downtown merchants will extend their hours to lure shoppers who may take advantage of the long days to stroll down Main or Washington.

    Most members of Shelbyville Merchants Association for Retail Trade (S.M.A.R.T.) will remain open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays. Many of the stores will also offer discounts and in-store specials during the extended hours.

  • A new view of old downtown

    While Patrick Rymer and Ray Wadsworth are at work, they have one of the best views of downtown Shelbyville to be found.

    Three-stories up in their hydraulic cherry picker, the two men can be seen just about every day of the week scraping and painting the exterior of buildings on Main Street. In the last couple years, the men have restored the outside of eight buildings in the downtown area.

    Along with freshening up the paint, Rymer has also made restorations to many of the trademark second-story windows in downtown.

  • Roberts heads to Woodford Farm Bureau

    After 10 years with the Shelby County Farm Bureau, Courtney Roberts has taken the position as agency manager with the Farm Bureau office in Woodford County.

    "It's a good move and I'm just real excited about it," Roberts said.

    Roberts went to work in Woodford County June 2 and will move there soon.

    "I have mixed emotions about his leaving," said Shelby County Farm Bureau Agency Manager Pat Hargadon. "But I'm super, super proud of him."

  • Union ties dissolved at foundry

    Almost a year after union workers from Ohio Valley Aluminum went on strike, a majority of the workers at the plant have voted to give the union the boot.

    On May 23, 52 out of 87 employees voted to decertify the United Steelworkers Workers from having representation and bargain rights for the workers there.

    While the union currently has the right to appeal the decision, a representative from the USW said the union is not going to challenge the vote.

    The vote brings to an end a nearly two-year struggle between the company and the union for a contract.

  • The check is in the mail - Stimulus payments arriving locally

    Over the next seven weeks, thousands of federal checks will be delivered locally that are expected to bring millions of dollars into the community.

    Suzette Boesing, officer-in-charge at the Simpsonville post office, said the first of the federal economic stimulus package checks started being delivered locally two weeks ago.

  • Beshear pledges support for industry - Applauds local manufacturing association

    Gov. Steve Beshear promised support for industries in Shelby County during his visit to the community Wednesday. Beshear, who spoke to a group of about seventy local business people at a luncheon at Claudia Sanders Dinner House, said there is no higher priority in his office than supporting Kentucky's industries and helping to create new jobs.

  • Bistro sold to former employee

    After more than 15 years of serving folks in downtown Shelbyville, the owners of Bistro 535 have decided to sell the establishment. Bill Hisle and Stuart Meredith are selling the business and property to Embry Herrick and family in order to concentrate their efforts elsewhere.

    Hisle and Meredith will maintain the catering wing of the business under the name of 535 Catering and also continue to operate the two Cattleman's Roadhouse restaurants.

  • Union up for vote at local foundry

    After nearly two years of negotiations, the Ohio Valley Aluminum Company and the United Steel Workers have reached a tentative agreement that is set to be voted on by the workers at the local foundry. However, before the contract is put to a vote, the workers will first have to decide if they want to keep or break their relationship with the union.