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Business

  • Business flying high

    Business is taking off for Roll Forming Corporation in Shelbyville.

    Literally.

    RFC, a subsidiary of Austria-based voestalpine, has announced a contract with the Boeing Company to produce formed and laser welded titanium structure components that will be installed on the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner airplanes.

    Bill Johnson, Chiefs Operations Officer, said the project is full of firsts for RFC, the aerospace industry, and Shelbyville.

  • Hardware creations

    Marty Page is getting back to his roots.

    The owner of Simpsonville Hardware for 20 years is spending his winter downtime creating works of art out of pieces of Plexiglas left over from his window-making projects. It may appear a strange combination - artwork sitting beside nuts and bolts, shovels and furnace filters - but the art is a part of Page he left behind years ago.

    "Some people said I'm going from hardware to art, but actually it's the other way around," Page said. "Being an artist is what I started out to do."

  • CUB names Bowling president

    Citizens Union Bancorp, the parent company of Citizens Union Bank, announced last week that it is promoting David M. Bowling to bank president.

    The move means that Billie Wade, who had been the bank's CEO and president, will shed the latter title.

    "It's a little additional assistance, and it's a little overdue, frankly," Wade said. "I have found myself wearing many, many hats."

    As bank president, Bowling will take over day-to-day operations of the bank, Wade said. CUB is based in Shelbyville and has branches in Jefferson and Hardin counties.

  • In class and on the job

    An internship program at a local college is offering students the opportunity to get on-the-job experience even before they receive their degrees.

    Pamela Larkin, professor of business studies at Jefferson Community and Technical College Shelby County, said students in the Office Systems Technology program are required to participate in a semester of "real world" job experience before they can graduate.

    Larkin said the experience of having an internship is an important part of students' education.

  • Reports take pulse of local industry

    Two reports on the state of industry in Shelby County -- one released by local officials, the other by the state - show companies are largely happy to be doing business here, though employers have some concerns about the quality of the local workforce.

    The Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation and the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce recently completed a survey of 41 of the county's 67 industries.

  • The 2008 legislative session: What business wants

    As 2008 quickly approaches, the Kentucky General Assembly will soon be in session with many difficult decisions to make. Gov. Steve Beshear's first budget will be under consideration, and hundreds of competing interest groups will be working to sway lawmakers' opinions. The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce will also be at the Capitol, speaking for the business community of Kentucky and hoping to improve the state's business climate for all Kentuckians.

  • Business rolls in for local company

    A local manufacturing company has recently changed its name and relocated in order to keep up with the amount of business that is rolling in.

    Scott Dixon, co-owner of Bluegrass Roller Service, said the company needed to double its manufacturing space in order to keep up with customer demands.

    Formerly Meisner Roller Co., the company outgrew its facility on Pearce Industrial Road and moved to a 20,000 foot facility on Brook Industrial Road last October - at which time the company also changed its name.

  • Steel workers, foundry at stalemate

    Union workers at a local aluminum foundry have been on and then off the picket line over the last eight months and still do not have a contract with their employer.

    And with a string of failed contract negotiations between the Untied Steel Workers and the Ohio Valley Aluminum Company, it is uncertain what will bring the two sides to a contract agreement.

    Kevin Baird, president of the USW local 1693, said the two sticking points are wage increases and union security and dues check off.

  • Passing the torch; Torrey Smith takes over dad's realty company

    Torrey Smith and his dad, W. A., believe that sometimes you have to step backwards to go forward.

    Starting Jan. 1, Torrey took ownership of the real estate firm W. A. has owned since 1979. At the same time, the company is regaining its independence. The company had been affiliated with the national real estate franchise ERA since 2002. Now it will be simply Torrey Smith Realty Co.

  • Business spotlight

    Who we are: Enhance Small Engine Repair

    Owned by: Dennis Hudspeth

    Where: 1021 Frankfort Road, inside Big-Top tobacco warehouse

    What we do: Offers service and repair to almost all small engine machines - including lawnmowers, blowers, chainsaws and ATVs. The shop also sells rebuilt and new lawn machines.

    We say: "I offer quality repair at low prices," Hudspeth said. He said he has 30 years of experience in working with small engines.

    Hours: Monday through Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.