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Business

  • Programs equip Hispanics for job market

    Twice a week a group of Hispanic women gather at Centro Latino in Shelbyville for a two-hour English lesson that is designed to help them communicate on the job and with folks in the community.

    Jerry Pope, the teacher of the class, switches from teaching in Spanish to English seamlessly in order to make hearing and responding to conversational English natural for his students. But Pope isn't just teaching the ladies a foreign language, he's teaching them a vital job skill.

  • New Business: Gold Skate Shop

    Gold Skate Shop is located at 605 1/2 Bayne Avenue, located in Village Plaza behind Tumbleweed Restaurant in Shelbyville.

    The shop is owned by David and Cheri Gold who opened the shop a couple of months ago. Their inventory includes skate boards and equipment, as well as helmets, protective gear, clothing, shoes and accessories.

    Business hours are Tuesday through Friday from 3 to 8 p.m.; Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. These hours will be extended after school is out for the summer.

    To contact the shop, call (502)437-0197.

  • Payday loan regulation dies in General Assembly

    With tax refund checks soon to be heading towards Shelby County, a number of local businesses are more than willing to cash those returns now - for a price.

    In the last two years, "payday loan" operations have become more and more common in the community and across the state. And while the promise of "money now" may seem tempting, the Federal Trade Commission has recently issued a warning saying that payday loans are risky endeavors that could lead to a dangerous cycle of taking out loans to pay loans and slowly falling into debt.

  • Estate planning for married couples

    Editor's note: Read more columns by local investment advisers in today's "Your Money" special section.

    As of Jan. 1, 2006, the law permits each American to transfer $2 million to heirs, tax-free.

    This is not because the I.R.S. has eliminated federal estate taxes. On the contrary, the estate tax is alive and well. The reason we pay no dollars in tax on $2 million is because each citizen possesses a transfer tax credit of $780,000. This figure just happens to equal the federal tax on an estate of $2 million.

  • Stocks and bonds and mutuals, oh my!

    Editor's note: Information for this story came from various financial organizations and websites, including Barron's, Morningstar, CNN Money, and Kiplinger's. As always, consult with an investment adviser before making decisions.

    Read more stories on investing and money-saving strategies in the "Your Money" special section insert in today's Sentinel-News.

    With the stock market down for the last five months in a row, and retirement funds in 401(k)s and savings shrinking like cheap sausage in a skillet, many investors are bewildered about what to do with their money.

  • The new Old Stone Inn

    The Old Stone Inn's new owners will soon reopen its doors and welcome diners back into the historic restaurant.

    Simpsonville natives and cousins Shelley Thompson-Cotton, proprietor, and Deanna Shelton, assistant, spent the month of March preparing their newly acquired business for the public.

    They said they hope to have the Old Stone Inn open before the 134th running of the Kentucky Derby on May 3.

    "We're ready to go," Shelton said. "We're just waiting on licenses and permits from the state."

  • Set to change

    After 60 years of being "on the air," broadcast television as we now know it will soon come to an end. In hopes of providing viewers with better picture quality and a wider range of broadcast options, TV broadcasts will soon be completely digital.

    Robert Biagi, part owner of the Biagi Company in Shelbyville, said while the switch from analog to digital broadcasting will likely enhance the experience of TV viewing, it has caused quite a bit of confusion locally.

  • New business spotlight: New doc in town

    We are: Future Hope Pediatrics

    Owned by: Dr. Laura White. White has her medical degree from the University of Louisville and did pediatrics residency at Kosair Children's Hospital. She worked in Shelby County for one year before spending the last 10 years working with a pediatrics group in Louisville. She and her family live in Waddy.

    "We know the need is out here," White said. "When they can't build enough schools to keep up with the kids, that's good news for pediatricians."

  • Max Performance to partner with Louisville Fire football

    Max Performance Physical Therapy and Sports Rehab, LLC has announced a partnership with the Louisville Fire Arena Football team for the 2008 arenafootball2 season.

    The Max Performance clinic, located in Shelbyville, was created by Alice Creque. Creque is one of only seven Sports Certified Specialists in Kentucky.

    Her father and Max Performance co-owner, Ron Creque Sr., said the partnership is exciting for a county that is becoming increasingly unique because of the vast services it offers.

  • Foundation offering seminars for industry leaders

    The Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation will offer a series of seminars aimed at helping local industry owners and managers compete effectively in the national and world marketplace.

    The first seminar will be held Wednesday, March 26 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension office at 1117 Frankfort Road. Reservations should be made by the end of the day today to get an accurate count for lunch. Call 633-5068.