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Business

  • Internet boosts homes sales

    Realtors used to dread the thought of a mouse running around a house that they were trying to sell.

    But that was before the age of the Internet - when a mouse only referred to a rodent.

    Now, as more and more houses are being viewed, toured and purchased through the web, local Realtors are doing everything they can to get potential homebuyers to use their mouse to scroll, point, and click their way into buying a home.

    Local Realtors said with a slow market, high gas prices, and the summer heat, the Internet has become a vital part of their marketing strategy.

  • BBB Torch Award Nominations

    The BBB's 2008 Torch Awards for Marketplace Ethics are unde rway...and we need your help to nominate worthy businesses for this esteemed award!

    Think of companies that you know and do business with, or the one that you work for, that has made a commitment to and exemplifies ethics and integrity in the marketplace. Consumers can also nominate non-profit organizations!

    The deadline for nominations is August 29, 2008! Submit your entry today! You can find a nomination form on the BBB website at www.louisville.bbb.org or call 502-588-0043.

  • Scooter sales zoom

    High gas prices and environmental concerns are helping scooter sales soar in Shelby County. And with fuel prices unlikely to decrease in the near future, local vendors are expecting these two-wheeled petrol sippers to become increasingly common on local roadways.

    Steve Stuver, general manager of Auto Pointe of Shelbyville, said in the six weeks their dealership has been selling scooters, they have had a hard time keeping models in stock.

    "Almost as soon as we get them assembled, we sell them," he said.

  • Financial focus: Study your history about market volality

    It happens every time the stock market drops: investors question their strategy, their luck and their timing -- all in an attempt to determine what went wrong and what they should have done differently. But if you, as an individual investor, really want to know how to respond to today's market decline, you need to look back at yesteryear.

  • Financial focus: Concerned about market volality? Study your history

    Financial focus: Concerned about market volality? Study your history

    Gordon Griffin/Edward Jones Investments

    It happens every time the stock market drops: investors question their strategy, their luck and their timing -- all in an attempt to determine what went wrong and what they should have done differently. But if you, as an individual investor, really want to know how to respond to today's market decline, you need to look back at yesteryear.

  • Leadership Kentucky visits Shelby, talks economic growth

    Business leaders from across Kentucky received an overview of what the state is doing to stimulate economic growth at a conference in Shelbyville Thursday morning.

    John Hindman, Kentucky secretary of economic development, told the 50-plus people in attendance that the key to bringing more businesses into Kentucky is improving the state's education system.

    "If I had a tax dollar to spend on economic development, I would put it towards education," he said.

  • Southern States joins company network

    Members of the local Southern States Cooperative have voted to be acquired by and become part of the larger regional Southern States Cooperative. The co-op had been owned and operated locally.

    The change took effect July 1.

    "It's a chance to deal better with the competition," said Southern States board chair Ray Tucker. "It's an opportunity for Shelbyville to become a better store."

  • RFC donates equipment to JCTC

    With a donation from Roll Forming Corporation, Shelby County's Jefferson Community and Technical College has boosted its arsenal of equipment in its machine tool technology program.

    A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at JCTC Thursday to celebrate the school's new Engel roll forming machine, valued at $12,500.

  • Want to show? Have some $ to spend

    Even though the love of the sport may be priceless, training and showing saddlebreds does come with a hefty price tag. The compiled list below provides approximate prices for the necessary tack a saddlebred enthusiast might spend.

    Saddles

    Depending on your needs, used saddleseat saddles can range in price from $300 to $1,000. New saddles range anywhere from $1,200 to $2500.

    Saddle Pads

    Choose from gel or shell pads, ranging in price from $33 - $40.

    Bridles

  • Residents can sign on for Homestead exemption

    If you are at least 65 years of age, you can save yourself $300 to $350 on your property taxes this year just by showing proof of age.

    The state's Homestead exemption law allows residents who are 65 years of age or older as well as residents who are 100 percent disabled to deduct $31,400 from the assessed value of their home before property taxes are paid. That means if a home is assessed at $100,000, the owner will have to pay property taxes on only $68,600.