.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • GRA-KAT's co-owner gets prestigious award

    Shelby's own GRA-KAT Environmental Services have been doing landscape, excavation and erosion contracting work since 1978.

    The company has worked some major land-management projects in the county, including the demolition on Shelby Manor Nursing Home and the development of sidewalks at the Court House and on Rocket Lane. It also provides environmental inspections and universal waste recycling.

  • Public transit could increase locally

    A Louisville company is hoping to increase the amount of public transportation locally by establishing an intercity bus route that transverses the state -- including stops in Shelby County.

    Miller Transportation, a bus provider located in Louisville, has joined a national network of buses in order to provide a regularly scheduled bus service for the general public that allows for transit from here to virtually anywhere.

  • The business of wild life

     Hunting and fishing has always been popular with many Shelby Countians. When a hunter gets the buck of a lifetime, he or she wants to preserve the trophy. So there has always been a need for someone to prepare the animal for display. That someone is a taxidermist.

    Joe Bland, of Waddy, a licensed taxidermist, recently completed the preparation of a bobcat, a 13-pound female trapped near Bagdad in 2005. She was the first one trapped in Shelby County since the early 1900s.

  • Shelby Energy workers unionize

    Local electrical workers are citing safety concerns as the reason they have voted to be represented by a labor union.

  • New Business

    New Business

    Who we are: Neutral One

    Owned by: Lin Fan

    Where: 132 Midland Trail, in the shopping center by Tractor Supply

  • Auto industry concerns continue

    The chief executives from the nation’s three largest automakers left Washington on Thursday empty-handed after spending three days pleading for a $25 billion bailout.

    With no government assistance, the companies and millions of U.S. jobs are in question, including close to 400 jobs here in Shelby County.

    The leaders of Ford, GM and Chrysler came before a Senate panel this week asking for funds to help the companies stay solvent during the current economic crisis.

  • EARLIER: County hit hard by job losses

    2008 has been a bear for local industries.

    By the end of the year, more than 10 percent of the industrial jobs that were here in January will have been gobbled up by economic issues that have plagued local employers.

    Shelby County began the year with nearly 5,400 industrial jobs, but by the end of December, 568 of those will be no more.

    And that's assuming that no more cuts are announced between now and then. Most recently announced were cutbacks at Leggett & Platt in Simpsonville, which will let 85 people go by December.

  • Shopping center saved from foreclosure

    A local investor recently saved a Simpsonville shopping center from the foreclosure chopping block.

    When Dan Ison was notified that the Town Center Plaza on Buck Creek Road had fallen into foreclosure, he knew he had to act and act fast.

    "I just couldn't stand the thought of this place going under," he said. "Our community would be hurt by having a vacant, boarded-up storefront on the main road into the heart of the city."

  • Eye care center has innovative vision

    Patients at Bowersox Vision Center on Washington Street have been undergoing a therapy, while not new, is a different approach, said Dan Bowersox.

    “It's been around forever,” he said “The thing is, kids that have these problems when they are little, grow up to have the same problems as adults.”

    The Mayo Clinic did a 12-week study using therapy similar to Bowersox's Vision Therapy.

  • New Business

    Who we are: Showcase Borders Owned by: Ron Stella Where: 100 Arlington Drive, Shelbyville

    What we do: During the summer, Ron Stella installs lawn curbing and borders. But this year when the leaves started to fall Stella went looking for a way to clean out gutters without getting on a ladder. Through an Internet search engine, Stella found the machine he was looking for. Since Stella bought his "gutter vac" last month, he has already serviced 10 local houses, some with gutters up to 30 feet high.