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Business

  • Noble Metals to close

    It's a headline that has printed often in recent months: yet another local industry is closing because of the downturn of the economy in general and the auto industry in particular, 

    Noble Metals informed the City of Shelbyville last week that it soon would be closing permanently, putting 79 non-union workers out of a job.

    The company employs 46 hourly workers in its Direct Labor Production, 22 hourly positions in indirect labor production, and 11 salaried administrative positions.

  • Recession not chewing up restaurants

    People still seem to be making their way to restaurants to eat, just maybe not with the same appetites.

    “They [the restaurants] all seem to be doing well,” Shelby Development Corporation Director Eileen Collins said. “I think everybody has been hit by the recession, but I think everyone is holding their own.”

    Many Shelbyville restaurants say they are hanging on the same way their customers are -- with careful money management.

  • Community leaders wish for a new conference center

    When a group of community leaders went to a planning retreat at Cedarmore Conference Center a couple weeks ago, the top item on their common wish list was for a new conference center in the county.

    "Right now we don't have a specific conference center," Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said. "There's no real center for the general use of the public to host conferences, workshops, etc. I think it'd just be another good drawing card for business and industry if we did have one. The community would benefit from that."

  • New Business: Bob's Hay Barn

     Name: Bob's Hay Barn

  • Shelby County Life bought by local investors

    A group of local investors has purchased the monthly magazine Shelby County Life.

    Led by the magazine's managing editor, James Mulcahy, and his wife, Julie, the group bought the magazine from longtime publisher William Matthews of Shelbyville. He started Shelby County Life in 2007.

    Matthews, who also is co-owner of the magazine Back Home in Kentucky, said he wanted to concentrate on other initiatives. "I had so many projects," said Matthews, who recently published a book and does other specialty products for clients such as Toyota.

  • Waddy to get some Love’s

    Conveniently located between Louisville and Lexington, the little town of Waddy is becoming quite the place for semi-trailer trucks to stop.

    Just north of I-64 in Waddy there's already a Flying J, readily available for truckers' needs, and now it appears there could soon be another one-stop option on the other side of the interstate.

  • BBB blows lid off newest scams

    The BBB  has issued descriptions of the latest scams circulating around the country, including the newest one, the Economic Stimulus Bill Scam.

    BBB also issued warnings about some companies that have very unsatisfactory records.

  • New business: Simpsonville Subway

    Simpsonville Subway

    Owner: Ankit Sheth

    Phone: 502-722-0085

    Address: 799 Aristocrat Ct., Simpsonville

    Hours: 10-10

    What we say: The Simpsonville Subway opened last Friday and is located behind the city’s Pilot Travel Center.

    “It’s a new store, and it’s different from the Shelbyville stores,” said owner Ankit Sheth. “We have a very nice operation – a nice clean store.”

  • EARLIER: A conference center tops community 'needs'

    What can we do to encourage economic growth in the community? What are we doing well? Where are we getting stuck? What are the priorities that need attention if we, as a community, are going to thrive 10 to 20 years down the road? 

    Those were the broad questions tackled at a planning retreat last week sponsored by the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation. This brainstorming session involved about 40 leaders of business, government and non-profit organizations from the community.

  • Nurseryman Ray inducted into hall of fame

    An old business axiom is that the first generation starts the company, the second generation grows the company and the third generation ruins the company.

    Third-generation nurseryman Mike Ray is not living up to that rule. Ray, who took over the Carl Ray Nursery from his grandfather in 1987, has grown the nursery and landscaping business into a multistate operation that offers services from tree planting to tree trimming, to landscaping, maintenance and pest control.