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Business

  • Waddy to get some Love’s

    Conveniently located between Louisville and Lexington, the little town of Waddy is becoming quite the place for semi-trailer trucks to stop.

    Just north of I-64 in Waddy there's already a Flying J, readily available for truckers' needs, and now it appears there could soon be another one-stop option on the other side of the interstate.

  • BBB blows lid off newest scams

    The BBB  has issued descriptions of the latest scams circulating around the country, including the newest one, the Economic Stimulus Bill Scam.

    BBB also issued warnings about some companies that have very unsatisfactory records.

  • New business: Simpsonville Subway

    Simpsonville Subway

    Owner: Ankit Sheth

    Phone: 502-722-0085

    Address: 799 Aristocrat Ct., Simpsonville

    Hours: 10-10

    What we say: The Simpsonville Subway opened last Friday and is located behind the city’s Pilot Travel Center.

    “It’s a new store, and it’s different from the Shelbyville stores,” said owner Ankit Sheth. “We have a very nice operation – a nice clean store.”

  • EARLIER: A conference center tops community 'needs'

    What can we do to encourage economic growth in the community? What are we doing well? Where are we getting stuck? What are the priorities that need attention if we, as a community, are going to thrive 10 to 20 years down the road? 

    Those were the broad questions tackled at a planning retreat last week sponsored by the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation. This brainstorming session involved about 40 leaders of business, government and non-profit organizations from the community.

  • Nurseryman Ray inducted into hall of fame

    An old business axiom is that the first generation starts the company, the second generation grows the company and the third generation ruins the company.

    Third-generation nurseryman Mike Ray is not living up to that rule. Ray, who took over the Carl Ray Nursery from his grandfather in 1987, has grown the nursery and landscaping business into a multistate operation that offers services from tree planting to tree trimming, to landscaping, maintenance and pest control.

  • Flying high for years to come

    At a time when doom and gloom dominates the Industrial headlines, Roll Forming Corporation [RFC] is flying high after announcing its latest major contract.

    Earlier this week it was announced that RFC and RTI International Metals have entered into a 10-year contract worth around $120 million to provide a product for The Boeing Company 787 “Dreamliner.”

    Through its Aerospace division in Shelbyville, RFC will supply the laser welding, forming, and inspection of structural titanium components manufactured by RTI.

  • Martinrea still open despite rumors of shutting down

    Despite a number of significant cutbacks and rumors that the plant could shut down, Martinrea is continuing to hang in there, at least for now.

    Sources inside the plant, who asked for anonymity because of the volatility of the employment situation, say they have heard the plant is going to close its doors soon, but so far, that has not come to pass.

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping, located at 1000 Old Brunerstown Road, currently has 400 employees.

  • New Business: Hadawreck Body Shop

    Hadawreck Body Shop is owned and operated by Tim and Michele Lily.

    The Lilys have been residents of Waddy for 14 years, where they live with their three children.

  • Rough 2008 knocks 84 Lumber out of Shelbyville

    The numeric logo is off the sign, the doors are boarded, and the gates are held shut with a lock and chain.

    The specifics are sketchy, but with little fanfare the 84 Lumber location in Shelbyville closed down last month.

    "We just got the word through the grapevine,” County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger said. "We haven’t heard anything official. They’re closing several of their facilities.”

  • In dad's footsteps

    Until he died suddenly a couple of years ago, local farmers relied on the skills of Dr. Roger Wonderlich to birth their calves, cure their horses' colic or trim their old cows' hooves.

    Now Roger's son, Ryan, is following in his dad's footsteps. He recently opened what might be called a traveling veterinary service. He does not have a permanent clinic – yet. His clinic is his truck.

    “I have to get started somewhere,” Wonderlich said. “I'll build the practice one day at a time.”