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Business

  • Business Briefcase Jan. 8, 2010

      

    Torrey Smith opens in Middletown

    Shelbyville-based Torrey Smith Realty Co. is opening an office at 12906 Shelbyville Road, Suite 220, in Middletown.

  • 125 years of a daily grind

    The skyscrapers in Bagdad are filled with corn, wheat and soybeans, not office workers.

    This weekend, the city's landmark business, Bagdad Roller Mills, a forest of steel gray silos in the heart of Bagdad, will celebrate 125 years in business. The company is one of the oldest agribusinesses in the region.

    There will be a customer appreciation day, complete with food and tours of the plant on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The mills are located near the intersection of Ky. 395 and Ky. 12.

  • Bekaert adds environmentally friendly technology

    Bekaert Shelbyville Plant Manager Kendall Hall said his employees start every day by talking about safety. Recently, the plant took a big step toward that goal of safety, both for its employees and the environment.

    “We're trying to walk the walk and talk the talk,” Hall said.

    The Bekaert Shelbyville Plant, which produces steel wire for products such as chain link fences to spiral bound notebooks, installed a new water-air patenting bath to replace the molten lead bath technology it previously used.

  • EARLIER: Let the holiday season begin

    Wakefield-Scearce Galleries will be holding its annual Christmas Gala until Saturday.

    Located at historic Science Hill at 525 Washington Street, this multiroom gallery features myriad holiday treasures for sale, as well as other antiques, for which the gallery is well-known.

    Decorator Patti Wilson said the gallery holds a Christmas Gala each year as a unique way to kick off the holiday season.

  • The new Goody’s opens its doors

    It’s back and bigger than ever. And so was the line to get in.

    After a brief absence from Shelbyville, Goody’s had its grand re-opening in Village Plaza on Thursday morning, and the threat of rain could do little to sway the horde of eager shoppers from attending.

    “I’d wish you the best of success, but it looks like the entire community is out to wish you all the best of success,” Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said to Goody’s staff and management before the ribbon cutting.

  • Talon Winery wins medals at State Fair

    Talon Winery and Vineyard isn't too aged — it has only been around for about a decade — but its wines continue to win awards.

    The winery, based in Lexington with a new location in Shelbyville, won six medals this week at the second annual Kentucky State Fair wine competition.

    Audrey Baumgardner, daughter of Talon owner Harriet Allen, said she's proud of their Kentucky-made wine.

  • Business Briefcase Dec. 24, 2009

     RE/MAX agents earn certifications

    Kristian Ruble and Keith Stratton of RE/MAX Performance Realty in Shelbyville have earned the Certified Distressed Property Expert designation, having completed extensive training in foreclosure avoidance and short sales.

  • Martinrea vets do the work despite the turmoil

    Two Martinrea employees have been with the company through thick and thin and are still hanging in there.

    Rex Edwards, quality manager, has been with Martinrea since 1989, and Marilyn Wise, who works in quality assurance, has a year on Edwards, having been with the company since 1988.

    Edwards said that he and Wise have seen the company through good times and bad - and three ownership changes - and they hope that times are improving economically.

  • H. Barry Smith Co. changes ownership

    Business has changed in the decades since Barry Smith started his real estate and auctioneering company in 1974. One thing that never changed was that Smith was at the helm. Until now.

    At the start of the year, H. Barry Smith Realtors and Auctioneers got new owners, as longtime associate Jimmy Willard and his nephew, Shawn Willard,  assumed ownership from Barry Smith.

    It was an easy decision for Smith, 66, because as his business developed, the working hand of a Willard was always a constant.

  • A staple of the community: Antiques For You celebrates 20 years

    In 1989, Connie Kelly borrowed $1200 from her uncle Joe to start an antique business at 528 Main St. in downtown Shelbyville.

    She had just seven booths of items in the front of the store and loads of uncertainty.

    Twenty years later, Connie and her husband, Larry, run what has become a veteran piece of the downtown puzzle - Antiques For You.