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Business

  • Fair's economic report: fair

    The bleachers nearly were packed with fans of the big tractors that pulled their loads down the stretch, sending a plume of thick black smoke into the air as they barreled to the finish line Saturday night. Big crowds are good news for the Shelby County A & M Association, commonly known as the fair board, which operates the fairgrounds.

  • Out with the new, in with the old

    With job security, rising fuel prices and overall debt weighing heavily on minds and wallets, more and more people are looking to save a buck.

    One increasingly popular method of dollar stretching is shopping for pre-owned items.

    And that goes right to the core of some local businesses, which have noticed some unusual trends.

  • New business: Affordable Lawn Care

    Affordable Lawn Care

    Phone: 502-437-0749 or 502-220-7594

    Owned by: Dean Moffett and his fiancé, Jessica Weaver.

    What we do: “They do mowing, any cleanup, basically anything anyone wants to do that they don’t have time or equipment to do,” said Charles Morgan, Moffett’s stepfather and assistant.

    “If somebody in a subdivision didn’t want to mow or had a vacation need, we’ll do whatever we need to do,” he said.

  • The New GM: Browning makes the cut, Bob Hook unsure

    General Motors Corporation has announced it will cut thousands of its dealerships across the nation, but the local impact of that is still unknown.

    David Hook, owner of Bob Hook Chevrolet of Shelbyville, said Thursday he still hasn’t heard anything from GM about whether or not his dealership will be a part of the leaner, more cost effective “New GM” expected to launch in the next 60 to 90 days as a separate company from the current GM.

  • Curbside recycling coming to Shelby

    The general consensus Dan Staples said he hears around the county is “we would recycle if curbside recycling was available.” Seeing the need, Staples, along with Jason Whisman and Jeff Long, want to make that option a reality and are working to get Living Green Curbside Recycling off the ground. “In the county there are no other curbside recycling services available,” Staples said. “We kicked around this idea for a year among business owners, family and friends.

  • Parker joins Shelby Veterinary Clinic

    Bring Laura Parker your dogs and cats; your horses, dairy cows and beef cattle. And your sheep, goats and pigs, too. Just leave your snakes at home.

    “I think the only animals I don't like are reptiles, snakes,” Parker said.

    Parker became the fourth veterinarian at Shelby Veterinary Clinic when she started work on Monday. She joins owner Dr. Melissa Lipps, Dr. Stephen Burchett and Dr. Rocky Oliver.

  • Walmart updates its 'experience'

    The Walmart Supercenter in Shelbyville is undergoing a significant expansion of its floor space in an effort to create a better shopping experience for its customers.

    This remodeling will give each of the store's departments an update, featuring new, wider aisles and more customer-friendly lower shelves. The exterior will get an update, too.

    Walmart officials said they based their plans on feedback from customers.

  • Walmart updates its 'experience'

    The Walmart Supercenter in Shelbyville is undergoing a significant expansion of its floor space in an effort to create a better shopping experience for its customers.

    This remodeling will give each of the store's departments an update, featuring new, wider aisles and more customer-friendly lower shelves. The exterior will get an update, too.

    Walmart officials said they based their plans on feedback from customers.

  • Down to earth

    John and Annie Hagan stop and smell the roses every day.

    They also water, fertilize and prune them.

    They own and operate Mount Eden Greenhouse, which is quite a large undertaking.

    Their business is comprised of four huge greenhouses,  encompassing a total of 1,500 square feet and literally hundreds of thousands of flowers, vegetables, herbs, hanging baskets, and potted plants.

    How does a young couple from Chicago fit into rural country living in a small town of 1,800?

  • 'He could do everything'

    Marvin Crouch is one of kind. Everybody says so, especially people who know him well.

    After 50 years of employment with the same company, he retired last Friday, amid tears, laughter, and a party in his honor.

    Diane Stephens, assistant manager at Bumper to Bumper, said she will really miss him.

    "That says it all," she said, pointing to a banner that stretched across the front of the shop bearing the words, "50 years of friendship, loyalty and the Best Service in Town."