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Business

  • Wendy’s charges restaurant tax by mistake

    Wendy’s Restaurant is back on track after mistakenly overcharging customers for nearly a month.

    That overage, totaling $2,973, was in the form of a 3 percent tax Wendy’s was charging customers for the newly instituted Shelbyville restaurant tax.

    The problem is, however, that the restaurant is not located within the city limits of Shelbyville, but instead in the county. Officials from Wendy’s corporate office said a customer brought the mistake to their attention.

  • Mild winter not reflected in seasonal sales

    Milder winter conditions do not seem to have had much of an impact on the sale of snow-related items in Shelby, retailers say, especially in the wake of the latest cold snap that brought as much as 4 inches of snow to parts of the county.

    “Our salt and snow shovels are pretty much out the door completely, anything to do with snow,” said Travis Winston, manager of Rural King. “We are also sold out of sleds.”

    But in anticipation of another cold spell this winter, he said the store would stock up at least one more time.

  • CVS implementing narcotic antidote program

    A national chain drugstore is expanding its program of offering a narcotic overdose antidote without a prescription.

    The program began two years ago in Rhode Island and has now expanded to cover nearly a third of the nation, but it will not be offered in the commonwealth, said officials for CVS Pharmacy.

  • Hot home market

    The temperatures in Kentucky right now might be unpredictable, but the mortgage forecast in Shelby County certainly hot.

    SmartAsset, a New York financial technology company, recently released its second annual study on the Best Places to Get a Mortgage and determined that Shelby County was ranked among one of the top 10 best counties in the state for securing a loan.

    To determine the top markets in the state, SmartAssest compared the likelihood of mortgage approval by county, mortgage rates, average five-year borrowing costs, and property taxes.

  • Shelby company ranked as one of state’s best places to work

    Edwards Moving & Rigging got word last week that it had been selected as one of the best small companies to work for in Kentucky, but the news didn’t come as a big surprise.

    “Honestly, I’ve been here two years and everything we listed that we feel makes this a great place to work has been in place long before I got here,” said Diane Breeding, human resources manager for Edwards.

  • Free industrial training

    Next month KentuckianaWorks, the Greater Louisville Workforce Development Board, is offering a free four-week course in production training with the aim of generating and preparing recruits to fill an employment void in the county’s industrial field.

    With a multitude of industrial facilities in Shelby County, there are an abundance of career opportunities available to the community.  Unfortunately, there does not seem to be an abundance of community members avidly seeking employment, and manufacturers are getting restless.

  • Housing market continues on upswing

    In 2015, the county continued its 3-year trend in increasing home sales, with increases in both home sales and residential building permits.

    Last year, the number of people building homes increased 30 percent, home sales were up 17 percent, and the average selling price increased 7 percent.

    Those numbers follow a steady trend of improvement over the last few years.

  • New restaurant coming to Midland Trail

    More than just budding trees will mark spring’s arrival in Shelbyville this year, as a new restaurant plans to open, as well.

    John Rothenburger IV, owner of Delfino’s Italian Bistro in Louisville, said he plans to open a second location at 1534 Midland Trail, the site of the former Japanese restaurant, UMI, situated next to Long John Silvers.

    “We’re hoping to open March first – it’s kind of a tentative date right now – but that’s what we’re pushing for,” he said.

  • Senior complex coming to eastern Shelby

    Construction begins today on a development that's being touted as the only one of its kind in Shelby County.

    Located in Mulberry Heights subdivision next to Kroger on Boone Station Road, Breas Crossing will consist of 44 patio homes and is the only development in the county targeted for seniors only, said Shelby County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger, who has championed the project because of its affordability for older people, he said.

  • Dealership to storage lot

    Eyebrows have been rising as the former Jeff Wyler Chevrolet Buick GMC lot on Taylorsville Road started filling up with trucks again over the last few weeks.

    After sitting vacant for nearly a year, there are now about 200 white incomplete work trucks occupying the space but despite people stopping by to look, there are no salespeople coming out.

    Rick Hill with Auto Truck Group, located in Kingbrook Commerce Center in Simpsonville, assures those vehicles are not for sale.