• Paving the way to success

    Bobby Hudson, president and CEO of the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation, still has another year to go before he retires next December, but he plans to spend 2018 grooming his replacement to take his place.

  • Pet store coming to Shelbyville

    Officials at Village Plaza say they are excited about a new pet store that will move into the now vacant space formerly occupied by Hibbert Sports. 

    "It's a really cool store," said Jerry Karem, owner of Village Plaza, of Petsense, a chain retail outlet store found in outlet malls and rural markets across the country. 

    Karem said that Petsense specializes in pet supplies and pet services, but does not sell dogs or cats. 

  • Former bingo hall gets facelift

    You may have noticed the former bowling alley and bingo hall on Midland Trail getting a touch up lately. The building, which has been vacant for nearly a year is now sporting a fresh coat of paint and even more improvements on the inside.

    That’s because there has been a lot of interest lately from potential buyers, said realtor Larry Rogers, who owns the building along with Barbara Hamilton.

  • Dogwood Art Gallery celebrating a year of success

     Dogwood Art Gallery & Gifts is celebrating its one-year anniversary next weekend and members of the committee say things have been going great.

    Sherrie Head, gallery committee member and treasurer of the Shelby Regional Arts Council, which the gallery supports, said over the past year they’ve learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t work for them as they get a good grasp on what the community wants.

  • Back by popular demand

    Temperatures might be low enough in Shelby County to make a polar bear shiver, but the housing market continues to heat up after a hot 2017. 

    Triple S Planning Commission Executive Director Ryan Libke informed commissioners during Tuesday’s meeting that the market is flourishing.

    For December, he said, the commission issued 42 total permits.  Of those, 19 dwelling units were created, he said.

    Those numbers put the commission at 718 permits issued for the year, 518 of which were dwelling units.

  • More development coming to Midland

    Development in the Midland Shopping Center is back on trac. 

    Following the lead of Planet Fitness and 4th Quarter, a new sports bar and grill, Feeder’s Supply is ready to open its 21st store, and first in the Shelby County market.

    Gale Gentry, director of human resources for the Louisville-based brand, said they look to open in the first weeks of February.

  • Brewing up business

    Several new dining options are in the works for Shelby County including at least one new brew pub headed to Main Street.

    Several sources have confirmed the owners of the Old Louisville Brewery are looking to develop and Irish pub and steakhouse at the former bank building at 601 Main Street. Old Louisville Brewery was established by brothers Wade and Ken Mattingly in 2016 with the aim of bringing a small craft beer bar to Old Louisville.  The owners were not available for comment.

  • Recycling Christmas

    Shelby County Recycling Center Director Rick Solomon gestured toward a mound of holiday gift-wrap overflowing a huge container while employees scurried to unload customers’ recyclables Wednesday.

    “It’s been pretty busy this morning,” he said. “I think it would be busier still if it warms up a little, people would be getting out more. Right now, I’m sure, most people don’t want to get out in the cold.”

  • Planting a new seed

     At 21 and 23 years old, Heather and Alli Veech may be young entrepreneurs, but they are eager to tackle their dream of opening a new restaurant on Main Street in Shelbyville.

    Located in the former Harvest Coffee and Cafébuilding, Bourbon Kitchen 524 is currently under the knife, getting a makeover that will change the dining experience in terms of both aesthetics and menu options.

    “We’re going to have breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Heather Veech said. “We’ll have a full caféwith the specialty coffee drinks.”

  • Biagi’s says goodbye

    For nearly a century, business at Biagi’s Appliance has been good. But as they say, all good things must come to an end.

    So as brothers Steve and Robert Biagi wrap up the store’s 90th anniversary, they are preparing to close the doors on the family business.

    Annibale Biagi established Biagi’s Appliances in downtown Shelbyville in 1927.  The business passed through the hands of their grandfather to their father, Vincent, and uncle, Hugh, before the brother’s joined them at the helm in 1993.