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Business

  • Former bingo hall gets facelift

    You may have noticed the former bowling alley and bingo hall on Midland Trail getting a touch up lately. The building, which has been vacant for nearly a year is now sporting a fresh coat of paint and even more improvements on the inside.

    That’s because there has been a lot of interest lately from potential buyers, said realtor Larry Rogers, who owns the building along with Barbara Hamilton.

  • An evolving labor force Personal care jobs growing

    As we approach Labor Day weekend and celebrate the workforce that makes our county move, it’s important to study how our workforce will need to transform through the future. While technology-based jobs will continue to evolve and grow, there are other areas our aging workforce will need.

    As the nation’s population ages, the need for workers to care for the elderly is projected to climb.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field of personal care workers is expected to climb to 27.9 percent by 2024.

  • Crackers lose zest at Kroger

    Shoppers at Kroger stores will notice that a favorite brand of saltine cracker is missing from the shelves recently.

    That’s because that Kroger is no longer carrying Zesta saltine crackers, store officials say.

    Alice Sims, assistant manager at Kroger, said that situation is more far-reaching than just the Shelbyville store, encompassing stores throughout the chain.

    She said she does not know whether the move was initiated by the store or by Keebler, the company that makes Zesta crackers.

  • Snagging safe sun spectacles

    The long anticipated eclipse is just three days away.  However, with NASA approved spectacles becoming as scarce as the top Christmas toy, chances are if you don’t already have a pair, the main event could pass right before your closed eyes.

  • Shelby man gets scholarship from distillers

     

  • Decades of devotion

    Today marks the end of an era for Don Carey who is retiring after nearly forty years with the Masonic Home of Shelbyville.

    When Carey came to work at the facility 38 years ago, he was just looking for a job, but what he found was a home, he said.

    A place where his wizardry in "fixin' everything that breaks" made him so indispensable that he rose to the rank of maintenance director, a position that didn't go to his head, but rather, to his hands.

  • Heavy-duty commitment

    A local company is making waves in the economic development sector across the state with a new apprenticeship program.

    Edwards Moving & Rigging, Inc. in Shelbyville has announced the creation of a new Transportation Apprenticeship Program that will work in conjunction with the Kentucky Labor Cabinet and the new effort could turn out to be a pilot program.

  • Local Father’s Day finds

    Father's Day is just a couple days away and if you still haven't picked out the perfect gift for the special dad in your life, your time to hit the stores is running short. 

    But before you grab the first generic coffee mug or tie at a national retailer, consider looking locally for some unique and special gift options.

    At Tipsy Gypsy Boutique you can pick up a brand new unisex Bourbon tee, a fantastic men's gift set from their Poo Pouri line, Rtic cups and Lazy One boxer shorts.

  • Masonic Homes gets national award

    A crowd of public officials, staff members, residents and others were on hand Wednesday at the Masonic Home of Shelbyville to receive a national award for excellence in dementia care.

    The award ceremony honored employees who contributed to the success of the Silver Angels program, which won the Excellence in Dementia Care award at the 2017 LeadingAge PEAK Conference in March.

  • Taking it to the next level

    A recent promotion for Shelbyville resident Matthew Collins has been a divine experience in his life.

    In May, Collins, director of Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary's Ernest Miller White Library, was promoted from associate to full professor of bibliography and research.

    His promotion follows an extensive review of his performance as a professor, his role as director of the library, and his contributions to the Louisville Seminary community, said Chris Wooten, director of communications at the seminary.