• Horsing around

    Dean Moffett grinned as he climbed down off his tractor to talk about his new venture – revamping a horse boarding operation just outside Bagdad.

    “It’s going to take a little bit of working, but I’m moving right along,” he said, gesturing to a broad expanse of pasture land in which several horses were grazing placidly.

    “We have forty acres here and I’m going to be reseeding pastures,” he said, “What with the winter and the mud…” he said, trailing off as a blond Palomino came up to greet him.

  • Work of art

    A local art and antique gallery renown for pristine works of cultural and historic quality has opened its doors this month to embrace a younger generation.

    Wakefield-Scearce Gallery, 525 Washington Street in Shelbyville, is taking part in National Youth Art Month with an exhibit from local and area students.

    “We thought it would be a good community outreach to have a youth art show here,” said Jenny Pippin, coordinator of the exhibit.

  • That’s the spirit


  • Feeding the children

    It’s that time of year again when the public gets the chance to show their support for local school children, to see that students in need get enough to eat.

    The Shelby County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee announced that Feb. 18-24 is Food Check Out Week and that Shelby County Farm Bureau will be collecting donations for the Shelby County Backpack Project. 

  • Restaurant serving much more than meals

    Since July, Joseph Lamb has been running a small restaurant on Main Street.

    The establishment, located at 1021 Main, may seen ordinary at first, but 1021 Park’s Place serves not only the usual patron, but also those who cannot pay for their meals, said Lamb.

    “I don’t just feed them, I try to meet their needs, whatever they might be,” he said.

    “So far, I’ve got twenty-two people off the streets.”

  • Feed store relocates

    For the second time in two years, a longtime equine feed store is undergoing a major change in moving to a new location.

    Excel Equine will move into its new location Monday, leaving its home of 40 plus years on Kentucky Street to 7th Street.

    Although the store will relocate, going to the intersection of 7th Street and Old Eminence Pike, right across from the Shelby County Detention Center, its products and services will stay the same, said store employee Megan Klein.

  • Delight-ful new business

     When one door closes another opens. So goes the fate of downtown Shelbyville recently. 

    And with the closure of several other storefronts on Main Street, many new businesses have followed behind with new openings.

  • Masonry students working to repair VFW building
  • Shelby County Automotive is 2nd fastest in Fast 50

     Earning the No. 2 spot out of 50 and top honors in the $10 million to $25 million category, locally based Shelby County Automotive, Inc. earned the recognition of one of the region’s fastest growing companies during a ceremony last week in downtown Louisville.

    Shelby County Automotive is an auto and truck parts retailer with locations in LaGrange, Shelbyville, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Winchester and Danville.  They are headquartered in Shelby County with the NAPA store at 114 Main Street in Shelbyville.

  • Company celebrating 50 years

    A Shelbyville company that can trace its roots back to the early days of the nation will Tuesday celebrate 50 years at its local location.

    “The plant, in 1967, was part of Revere Copper and Brass, which was actually founded by Paul Revere,” said John Wherry, a former CEO who is a board member of Revere Packaging.