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Business

  • A higher purpose for a new event space

     

    The vacant building located at 533 Main Street in Shelbyville, adjacent to La Cocina De Mama, is now being put to good use.

    Torrey Smith of Torrey Smith Realty Company is the current owner of the property and said there has been a lot of discussion in regards to the use of the space.

    But while there has been much speculation floating around concerning the anticipated use of the 2,200 square foot building – including talks of a craft brewery – Smith said those are just rumors.

  • JHS implements new electronic records system

    Big changes at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville may not be readily noticeable to patients, but they will certainly benefit from the results, say hospital officials.

    “We have been on this journey for over a year, and went live with the electronic medical record on Saturday, September sixth, and it’s been great,” said Chief Nursing Officer Anne Spencer.

    The OneCare program’s goal is to transform health care by creating a shared, electronic universal health record for each patient in the KentuckyOne Health system.

  • Business briefcase: Oct. 31, 2014

    Masonic Home’s Carey

    honored by state group

    Masonic Home of Shelbyville’s Director of Environmental Services Don Carey was awarded the Supportive Services Award by the state’s largest industry association, LeadingAge Kentucky, recognizing his devotion to the residents throughout his 35 years at the Home.

    Carey is responsible for the maintenance of the 113-year-old building and nearly 200 acres.

  • CUB employees host annual

    For the third year in a row, employees of Citizens Union Bank teamed up to volunteer at charitable and other organizations throughout the county.

    The bank chose Oct. 13, Columbus Day, to do community work so it wouldn’t affect employees’ schedules, said CUB CEO David Bowling.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION Distillery development is strutting along

    The Triple S Planning Commission has a brief agenda for their meeting Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington St. in Shelbyville.

    The commission will hear a preliminary plat for a subdivision of Rut ‘N’ Strut Distillery on Gordon Lane.

    The plat proposes two tracts and the extension of Gordon Lane, which is currently a gravel strip of road.

    The property is a total of 128 acres, but is to be divided into two tracts, both larger than 60 acres, said Joyce Nethery, who owns the property along with her husband Bruce Nethery.

  • Crop insurance can pay off

    A storm that produced hail in the northern portion of the county last week didn’t cause much damage overall in Shelby, but farming business suffered heavy losses.

    Amanda Gadzik, co-owner of Mulberry Orchard near Bagdad, said that about 98 percent of the apple crop – about 200 bushels – was damaged to the extent they couldn’t be sold as whole fruit.

  • Flu shots in full swing before the flu

    Walgreens personnel gave out almost 75 free flu shots Wednesday in Shelbyville at the Church of the Annunciation’s Community Hall to those served by Centro Latino.

    Morgan Justice, pharmacy manager at Walgreens, said the store looks for charities to help with out free flu shots.

    She said that Walgreens routinely goes onsite to give flu shots, although not all are free.

    “This is free for them,” she said, glancing around the room. “This is the first charity I've done, we hooked up with Sister Pat [Reno] to do this.”

  • Chamber unveils new payment structure

    Members of the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce will soon be required to adhere to a new structure of payment.

    At the beginning of the year, the Chamber will be changing their payment and enrollment structure.  Existing clients will soon be converted into a new type of membership, not one that pertains to the type of business, but rather the services desired.

  • Farmers downplay federal move to remove teens from tobacco fields

    While lawmakers in Washington push for a ban from children working in tobacco fields, local farmers aren’t quite sure that’s the right move.

    Current U.S. agriculture labor laws allow children 12 and older, with their parent's permission, to be hired for unlimited hours outside of school hours on a farm of any size. Also, youths of any age may work at any time in any job on a farm owned or operated by their parents.

    But that could change, as 35 House Democrats made a plea to U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez last week to stop that practice.

  • Chugging into expansion

    Edwards Moving and Rigging has long been known for transporting extremely large items all over the country, and now they’re adding another dimension at their location on Everett Hall Road in Shelbyville.

    Gathered in front of a newly established railroad spur, Edward’s representatives, local officials and other industry leaders held up a blue ribbon while company owner Mark Edwards ceremoniously snipped it to open the company’s new set of tracks.