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Agriculture

  • Shelby's new ag agent not new to field

    Corinne Kephart may be new to the field of county agriculture agent, but she is hardly new in the field.

    You could say, in fact, that Kephart, who was named in April to replace Brett Reese as the oracle for farming in Shelby County, has been out thereall her life, having most recently served as the horticulture agent at the Shelby County Extension office and before that as 4-H agent.

  • Reichert is new horticulture extension agent

    A familiar name and face has a new role in the Shelby County agricultural scene.

    Walt Reichert, former editor of The Sentinel-Newsand faculty member of Jefferson Community & Technical College’s Shelby County campus, is the new horticulture technician at the University of Kentucky’s Shelby County Extension Office. He replaces Corinne Kephart, who recently moved from that job to be the agriculture agent.

  • Scholarship winners

    Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association president Irvin Kupper (second left) presents John McKinney, Tyler Goodlett and Matthew Young with $2,500 scholarships at the Cattlemen’s annual picnic in July.

  • Ag report: July 25, 2014

    Kentucky Small Ruminant Profit School

    offered for first time

    The Small Ruminant Profit School (SRPS) is now taking registrations. SRPS is an educational program of four classes over six month for sheep and goat producers that covers topics ranging from breeds, types of operations, facilities/equipment, health management, parasite management, foot care, marketing, genetics & selection, and much more.

    Benefits of SRPS:

  • Poor pollination can hold back corn crop

    Small stalks, small ears, poor kernel development… does this describe your corn crop this year? Or maybe the raccoons absconded with the crop!

    If this sounds like you there may be several factors at work. Drought at the wrong time can stunt your corn crop and cold damage can stunt corn. If you put your crop out early you could see a little stunting from a late spring cold snap. And poor drainage and poor soil fertility, especially nitrogen, can stunt the crop as well.

  • Ag report: July 18, 2014

    Tobacco funds restored

    Although a tobacco settlement arbitration that was not in Kentucky’s favor could have led to deep cuts to Kentucky Agricultural Development Funds, a new agreement with tobacco manufacturers will restore almost all of those monies, according to agricultural and state officials.

  • Distilleries officially have a new home

    The Shelbyville City Council finished with its amendments and approval of changes to the zoning text amendment, which will allow distilleries on 25-acre properties zoned Agricultural within the city limits.

    Thursday, council members approved a second reading of amendments to ordinance relating to non-domestic animals, including an addition of a line to include that any preexisting fences in place on agricultural property prior to the rezoning of adjacent property would be exempt from the 100-foot setback requirement.

  • Ag report: June 27, 2014

    State offering

    spay/neuter grants

     

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is offering grants totaling $150,000 to help Kentuckians spay and neuter their pets.

    Grants are limited to a maximum of $5,000 and the application must be submitted by July 15. The program is funded by sales of Kentucky’s spay/neuter license plate. The Kentucky Animal Control Advisory Board also accepts donations to the program.

  • Hummingbirds in your backyard

    Birdwatchers, gardeners and backyard enthusiasts are busy filling their red plastic feeders with sugar water as summer approaches in hopes of attracting a large selection of the swift, speedy, allusive hummingbird.

    The species include the smallest bird in the world – the bee hummingbird – and they can fly up to 30 miles per hour. When diving, their wings can flap 200 times per second, and they can travel at over 60 miles per hour.

    Hummingbirds hover, fly sideways, backwards and have even been known to go upside-down.

  • Ag report: May 30, 2014

    Comer cheers launch

    of UK hemp pilot program

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. —The University of Kentucky launched its industrial hemp pilot program Tuesday when hemp seeds were planted at Spindletop Farm, marking another milestone in the drive to restore industrial hemp production to the commonwealth.