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Agriculture

  • Thompson & Nash's Moffett still cultivating a farm business

    For Bill Moffett, current owner of the Thompson & Nash Feed Store at the intersection of 6th and Henry Clay streets in Selbyville, the news that Southern States cut its retail sales operation leaves him with mixed emotions.

    On the one hand, Moffett said he hopes that one fewer competitor would bring more business to his own store. But on the other, he has a personal link to the Shelbyville Southern States store.

  • Business Q&A: Bobby Foree

    Bobby Foree is a seventh-generation family farmer and a lawyer who owns land in Shelby County and lives in Henry County. He graduated from the University of Kentucky with a bachelor’s degree in animal science and earned a master’s degree in agriculture education. He also earned a law degree from UK. He farms beef cattle. His wife is the former Jean Kaye LeCompte of Shelby County. They have two children. He spoke with Brad Bowman of Landmark News Service.

     

  • No-till approach becoming the norm for farmers

    It’s that time of year again, when farmers are out in their fields planting their crops.

    And for most crop farmers – tobacco being the exception – a method known as “no-till planting” is used increasingly.

    Instead of “digging up” the ground to plant the coming year’s seed, planting machines make a narrow initial slice in the ground, drop the seed in and then close the slice up again.

  • Shelby woman wants to be a voice in agriculture

    A Shelbyville woman is one of 16 people around the state who is very interested in making a difference in her community when it comes to agriculture.

    Amanda Gajdzik, who with her husband, Matt, owns Mulberry Orchard near Bagdad, recently returned from Washington D.C., as part of a Kentucky Farm Bureau leadership class.

  • Statewide equine survey reveals horses are billion dollar industry

    The first part of Phase 1 of the annual statewide equine survey is out, and the results are of particular importance to the horse industry, officials say, as the study found that the total of all equine-related sales and income for equine operations in 2011 was about $1.1 billion.

    That total came from sales of all equines, estimated to be $521.1 million, and $491 million in income from services provided, including both breeding and non-breeding services such as training, lessons, boarding, farrier, transportation, purses, incentives, etc.

  • Shelby vineyard harvests grapes for sale

    Shelby County’s return to its wine-making roots was in full vintage on Saturday, when Vegh-Davis Vineyard called in a few friends to help gather about 4.5 acres of traminette grapes at a converted farm on Hempridge Road.

  • Shelby's new ag agent not new to field

    Corinne Kephart may be new to the field of county agriculture agent, but she is hardly new in the field.

    You could say, in fact, that Kephart, who was named in April to replace Brett Reese as the oracle for farming in Shelby County, has been out thereall her life, having most recently served as the horticulture agent at the Shelby County Extension office and before that as 4-H agent.

  • Reichert is new horticulture extension agent

    A familiar name and face has a new role in the Shelby County agricultural scene.

    Walt Reichert, former editor of The Sentinel-Newsand faculty member of Jefferson Community & Technical College’s Shelby County campus, is the new horticulture technician at the University of Kentucky’s Shelby County Extension Office. He replaces Corinne Kephart, who recently moved from that job to be the agriculture agent.

  • Scholarship winners

    Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association president Irvin Kupper (second left) presents John McKinney, Tyler Goodlett and Matthew Young with $2,500 scholarships at the Cattlemen’s annual picnic in July.

  • Ag report: July 25, 2014

    Kentucky Small Ruminant Profit School

    offered for first time

    The Small Ruminant Profit School (SRPS) is now taking registrations. SRPS is an educational program of four classes over six month for sheep and goat producers that covers topics ranging from breeds, types of operations, facilities/equipment, health management, parasite management, foot care, marketing, genetics & selection, and much more.

    Benefits of SRPS: