.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • $282K to be shared in Shelby's CAIP this year

    Shelby’s County Agricultural Investment Program again is open for applications for cost-share grants to reimburse agricultural development projects for producers.

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board announced that it had awarded $282,000 to the Shelby County Agricultural Development Foundation Inc. to be distributed, which is down from an adjusted total of $500,000 in 2012..

  • Farm day sends visitors all over Shelby County

    The county’s first shot at a Good Neighbors Farm Tour got a little rain water and chilly temps on Saturday and then sprouted into a big time event for sponsors the Shelby County Extension Office and Metzger’s Country Store and several local farms.

    “The day could not have been better,” said Corrine Belton, the county’s extension agent for agriculture and natural resources. “It was a little wet in the morning, but it turned out to be a beautiful day.”

  • Shelby County winners at Kentucky State Fair, Sept. 6, 2013

    These results were gleaned from those posted at kystatefair.org. As others become available, they will be published.

    FFA Exhibits

    Hay

    Best Exhibit Of Alfalfa Hay (Less Than 5 percent Grass)

    Blue, Nancy Cottrell, Finchville, Collins High School FFA

    Taylor Nash, Simpsonville, Collins High School FFA

    Best Exhibit Of Alfalfa Hay (Less Than 5 percent Grass)

    Sabrina Shaver, Shelbyville, Collins High School FFA

  • Shelby County winners at Kentucky State Fair, Aug. 30, 2013

    These Results Were Gleaned From Those Posted Atstatefair.Org. As Others Become Available, They Will Be Published.

     

    Large Livestock

    Dairy Cattle

    Herdsman Award

    1. Rachel White, Waddy

     

    Ayrshire

    Heifer, Junior Calf - Born March 1, 2013 Thru April 30, 2013

    10. 8th, Small AYR Michelle April Louise, Emily Goins, Waddy

  • Shelby County winners at Kentucky State Fair, Aug. 23, 2013

    These results were gleaned from those posted at kystatefair.org. As others become available, they will be published.

    Antiques

    Doll (not to exceed 18 inch size limitation)

    2. Cindy Weber Hammond, Simpsonville

    Carnival Glass Piece

    3. Cindy Weber Hammond, Simpsonville

     

    Bees and Honey

    Open Class

    One block of beeswax weighing 1-5 l

    2. Katherine Bricking-Woods, Shelbyville

  • State fair competition is big business for little people

    For an early introduction to the agricultural industry, you would have to be very carefully to beat participating in 4-H and competing at the annual Kentucky State Fair.

    After all, developing animals and products is a consistent and educational practice in itself. When you add doing so competitively – at fairs and shows – the “hobby” can become time-consuming and require an investment of money as well.

  • Thompson & Nash's Moffett still cultivating a farm business

    For Bill Moffett, current owner of the Thompson & Nash Feed Store at the intersection of 6th and Henry Clay streets in Selbyville, the news that Southern States cut its retail sales operation leaves him with mixed emotions.

    On the one hand, Moffett said he hopes that one fewer competitor would bring more business to his own store. But on the other, he has a personal link to the Shelbyville Southern States store.

  • Business Q&A: Bobby Foree

    Bobby Foree is a seventh-generation family farmer and a lawyer who owns land in Shelby County and lives in Henry County. He graduated from the University of Kentucky with a bachelor’s degree in animal science and earned a master’s degree in agriculture education. He also earned a law degree from UK. He farms beef cattle. His wife is the former Jean Kaye LeCompte of Shelby County. They have two children. He spoke with Brad Bowman of Landmark News Service.

     

  • No-till approach becoming the norm for farmers

    It’s that time of year again, when farmers are out in their fields planting their crops.

    And for most crop farmers – tobacco being the exception – a method known as “no-till planting” is used increasingly.

    Instead of “digging up” the ground to plant the coming year’s seed, planting machines make a narrow initial slice in the ground, drop the seed in and then close the slice up again.

  • Shelby woman wants to be a voice in agriculture

    A Shelbyville woman is one of 16 people around the state who is very interested in making a difference in her community when it comes to agriculture.

    Amanda Gajdzik, who with her husband, Matt, owns Mulberry Orchard near Bagdad, recently returned from Washington D.C., as part of a Kentucky Farm Bureau leadership class.