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Agriculture

  • WICHE: Spring weed control starts now

    My friend Dee Dee keeps asking me about the best way to eradicate the creeping Charlie that has invaded her back yard. She is reluctant to use synthetic herbicides, or “poisons” as she puts. I can relate because I feel the same way.

    However, controlling certain weeds otherwise takes some serious planning and commitment during the entire season.

  • Tops among his crop

    Ray Tucker is a sixth-generation farmer in Shelby County, and he has been judged first-rate in the state.

    The Kentucky Young Farmers Association has named Tucker its state member of the year.

  • WICHE: Seed starting indoors with a heated mat

    My Christmas present this year was a great little seed-starting kit equipped with a tray, greenhouse top and heated mat. The heated mat is the special treat.

    In the past the seed tray would sit in the not-so-convenient spot in front of the refrigerator, where the heat escapes at the bottom. I am very excited about this new source of heat; I have had entire trays of peppers fail because the soil wasn’t warm enough!

  • WICHE: Potato crop first in the

     Once again, I am proud to say that our potato crop lasted from March 2009 to March 2010. It’s time to start it all over again, thank goodness! I am really ready to get my hands in the soil, once it dries out a bit.

    First things first: While I always shoot for a mid-March planting of selected seed potatoes, we must consider the condition of the soil. Don’t start digging if the soil is too wet. Be patient and only work once the soil is friable.

  • WICHIE: Pepe la Pew wasn’t so far from the real thing

    Remember Pepe la Pew, the cartoon skunk?

    Pepe would follow the lovely black feline Penelope Pussycat, who, in some episodes painted a white stripe on her back to escape dog harassment and in others she accidentally scooted under a newly painted white fence. In any case Pepe was a persistent suitor.

  • Ag concerns growing quickly for students

    The concern about changes about the agriculture program and classes planned for Shelby County and Collins High Schools next year brought a large group to last week’s school board meeting and a detailed My Word piece from two SCHS students that ran in Wednesday’s Sentinel-News.

  • WICHE: Early April treatment for emerald ash borer

    The emerald ash borer was first identified in southeast Michigan in the summer of 2002. By 2009 it hit really close to home.

    The first two confirmed Kentucky sightings where in Jessamine and Shelby counties. In Indiana the heaviest concentration of infestation is in the Northeast of the state; the rest of the state is considered intermittingly infested. 

  • Farm Bureau delegation heads to D.C.

    John Wills of Shelby County Farm Bureau will be one of approximately 200 KFB members who will be in Washington next week to meet with the state’s elected leaders. Farm Bureau’s annual Congressional tour is Monday through Thursday and includes individual question-and-answer sessions with Republican senators Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning and others. “We will meet with Congressman [Brett] Guthrie [R-Bowling Green] then both senators for group Q&A sessions, and other FB members will meet with their congressman,” Wills said via E-mail.

  • Kephart first woman to head cattleman's group

    The Sentinel-News: You were named this week as the first woman to be named president of the Kentucky Cattleman's Association. How does that feel?

    Corinne Kephart: I am excited to be serving as the 2010 KCA President. Kentucky's cattle industry is one of the most viable and progressive in the nation, and I am

  • WICHE: Snow might actually help plants hit by road-clearing agents

    A blanket of snow has the ability to brighten the dreariest of days. And despite school closures and tricky driving, a snow-covered landscape proves to be quite beautiful.

    It’s not so bad for the plants either, so don’t be tempted to knock the snow off drooping branches.

    Snow has an insulating effect that is particularly useful when we do have frigid temperatures.  Ground-level snow  actually will protect the roots and crowns of perennial and woody plants, but you may notice a little burn above the snow level when it comes to broadleaf evergreens.