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Agriculture

  • Farm Bureau delegation heads to D.C.

    John Wills of Shelby County Farm Bureau will be one of approximately 200 KFB members who will be in Washington next week to meet with the state’s elected leaders. Farm Bureau’s annual Congressional tour is Monday through Thursday and includes individual question-and-answer sessions with Republican senators Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning and others. “We will meet with Congressman [Brett] Guthrie [R-Bowling Green] then both senators for group Q&A sessions, and other FB members will meet with their congressman,” Wills said via E-mail.

  • Kephart first woman to head cattleman's group

    The Sentinel-News: You were named this week as the first woman to be named president of the Kentucky Cattleman's Association. How does that feel?

    Corinne Kephart: I am excited to be serving as the 2010 KCA President. Kentucky's cattle industry is one of the most viable and progressive in the nation, and I am

  • WICHE: Snow might actually help plants hit by road-clearing agents

    A blanket of snow has the ability to brighten the dreariest of days. And despite school closures and tricky driving, a snow-covered landscape proves to be quite beautiful.

    It’s not so bad for the plants either, so don’t be tempted to knock the snow off drooping branches.

    Snow has an insulating effect that is particularly useful when we do have frigid temperatures.  Ground-level snow  actually will protect the roots and crowns of perennial and woody plants, but you may notice a little burn above the snow level when it comes to broadleaf evergreens.

  • WICHE: Offer long-lasting Valentine blooms

    Cut flowers are undoubtedly the most popular manifestation of showing your love for someone on Valentine’s Day, but potted flowering plants do the trick, too.

    Perhaps the potted bloom has the potential to remind your lover that the sentiment lasts all year…but what does it mean if you can’t get to bloom again?

    Is your loved doomed? Of course not, but here are some tips just in case.

  • WICHE: Considerations for new and existing orchards

    When it comes to the home orchard, some planning is a good must. Some fruit is easier then others, and it is often hard to discern in the catalogs which apple variety, blueberry or persimmon will do well in Kentuckiana.

    My No. 1 rule is the more information a catalog provides the better. Gathering as much information as possible is the key to success when it comes to fruit trees.

  • WICHE: Anniversary of the ice storm is time to reassess

    It has been one year since the devastating ice storm of 2009. I am tempted to honor the power of Mother Nature by having an evening without electricity (save the refrigerator and using electricity for the pump that delivers water from the cistern!).

    It was a humbling experience for many of us which most of us are over; but the impact on many of our trees in the landscape remains apparent. 

  • Not all those in young farmers are young

    The first thing to know about the Shelby County Young Farmer's Association is that age is not a prerequisite. Gathered in a Shelby County High School classroom to share a Christmas potluck supper, the faces of the club show years of hard work outside.

    There are a handful of young faces, too, many of them second-generation members. It's the older farmers who do much of the talking.

  • WICHE: Mail-order plants not always what they claim

    This time of the year subtle warnings come from professionals reminding the consumer to be skeptical of mail order catalogues or advertisements that claim “new horticultural breakthroughs,” otherwise outrages claims or mass quantities of things for bargain basement prices.

    There are legitimate “horticultural breakthroughs” but usually different terminology is used, and you’ll find them at your local stores.

  • WICHE: Starlings and the bird count

    The surprising thing about starlings is that they are everywhere yet not from here.

    It’s another story of one good intention going bad! Apparently back in 1890, in honor of a Shakespeare festival in New York City’s Central Park, 60 European starlings were released. The following year another 40 were released, and today the bird is one of the most numerous species in North America. 

  • Contractor turning old farm into new animal sanctuary

    Dennis Schuman pointed methodically around the gutted barn. This would be a stall for the lambs, he said, and this would be for the goats, and two would be for the chickens.

    The adjacent, dilapidated milk parlor would be a kennel for dogs. A smaller kennel would house cats. Another barn, just 30 feet away, will be remodeled for horses.

    "What we're going to do is make it into a sanctuary and rescue for pets," Schuman said.