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Agriculture

  • WICHE: Sweet potatoes yield a bumper crop

    We are still eating from a fantastic harvest of sweet potatoes last fall.  I planted out about 25 organic slips purchased from Country Corner Greenhouse in Shepherdsville in late May, and by early November we had 4 nursery crates full of one of nature’s perfect foods! 

    Seven months and counting in storage with no spoilage is impressive, but now we are down to about six sweet potatoes – just in time for a transition to other summer vegetable. 

  • WICHE: Plant propagation from softwood cuttings

    The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing, which is frequently done in early spring before new growth or in the fall before plants go dormant. 

    Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants, but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant. 

  • Ag report: May 16, 2014

    Comer sues U.S. Justice Department

    to get hemp seeds released

    Calling a Drug Enforcement Administration's earlier offer to release hemp seeds a "bait and switch" tactic, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture on Wednesday sued the U.S. Justice Department.

    Agriculture Commissioner James Comer filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Louisville against the Drug Enforcement Administration, Customs and Border Protection, the Justice Department and Attorney General Eric Holder.

  • Ag report: May 9, 2014

    Jonathan McGinnis joins American Angus Association

    Jonathan Tyler McGinnis of Shelbyville is a new junior member of the American Angus Association, according to the St. Joseph, Mo., based organization.

    Junior members of the association are eligible to register cattle, participate in programs conducted by the National Junior Angus Association and take part in Association-sponsored shows and other national and regional events.

  • Tomato 101

    “Tomato 101” is for beginners and advanced gardeners alike.  There are many assumptions about the tomato that sometimes get passed on by the most well-meaning aficionado.  I take my tomatoes seriously and have developed a routine to hedge my bets for a healthy summer harvest.

    When it comes to spring fever the tomato is the most abused and most people still plant too early. 

  • Acclimate plants carefully to prevent burning foliage

    I made a big mistake last year and burned up my Kalanchoes- it took the entire summer for these cool succulents to recover.  I will not make that mistake again!

    After adding another crinkled-leaf variety to my collection, which I purchased from Gallrein’s greenhouses last week, I set to the task of resetting our patio with plants and seat cushions.  I was very mindful of providing some afternoon shade for my succulent collection.  

  • Ag report: May 2, 2014

    Georgetown College joins

    Farm to Campus program

    Georgetown College last Friday became the seventh higher education institution in Kentucky to join the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s Farm to Campus Program.

  • Match mulching material with plant needs

    Mulch has become a landscape staple, almost to a fault when it is over applied – smothering roots and girdling trunks.  When done properly is can help to suppress weeds, retain moisture and moderate temperature.  These things can be achieved using a variety of materials, but which type of mulch suits your needs best?

  • Ag report: April 25, 2014

    KSU opens new

    High Tunnel Complex

     

    Kentucky State University in Frankfort today will host a ribbon cutting and open house for its new High Tunnel Complex. The open house will begin at 10:30 a.m. and the ribbon cutting at 11:30.

  • No planting yet, but farmers aren’t worried

    Shelby’s farmers say that they typically plant near the end of April, so they’re not too concerned about the spring crop season yet, but if the weather stays rainy and cool it could be a different story.

    “It’s not a big concern right now, but if it stays wet and cool for another two weeks, it will be,” said Paul Hornback, who is planning to put in 2,400 acres of corn and soybeans and 100 acres of tobacco.