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Agriculture

  • Kentucky Ag Report: Jan. 7, 2011

    San-N-Tone kicks off
    2011 series Sunday

    San-N-Tone Ranch in Simpsonville will host its first Horse Show Series event of 2011 on Sunday.
    The event will begin at 9 a.m. at the Shelby County Fair Grounds’ indoor arena.
    Events also are scheduled for Feb. 6 and March. 6.
    Entries closed on Thursday and will do so on the Thursdays before future events.
    For more information call Sandy Stewart (502-241-1262 or 722-9330) or E-mail SANNTONESHOW@yahoo.com.

    Crop assistance starts Monday

  • WICHE: Resist temptation to continue bad habits

    We all have bad habits. Some people chew their fingernails; others mow their grass too short in the summer. You can guess which one bugs me the most.
    The odd thing about many of the worst bad habits in the garden is that they have become so commonplace. The worst offenses are repeated everywhere to the extent that gardeners think they are the rule.
    Over-mulching, for example, has been an epidemic problem for many years despite the fact that research spells out trouble for our plants when we bury their roots under a foot of hardwood mulch.

  • Kentucky Ag Report: Dec. 31, 2010

    Crop assistance
    requests start Jan. 10

  • WICHE: Best books 2010

    I like a book that tells a story while teaching me a little something along the way.  I like when the writer’s personality is revealed in their prose, and I like when a book makes me feel like I am not the only one that marvels at what nature and people can do.
    Here are my 2010 picks for just this sort of thing:

  • WICHE: Holiday spices from tropical plants

    Considering how the quest for exotic spice fueled exploration around the world in the 15th century, it is no wonder that our favorite holiday flavors herald from around the world.

    From Southwest India to Southeast Asia we find cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and mace.

  • WICHE: Christmas trees: Fresh-cut, live or artificial?

    Picking out the perfect Christmas tree is serious business for me.Some may find it a trivial chore, but I want a tree that will be worth the effort of cleaning, moving furniture, hauling boxes, lights, step ladders and more.

    But once the mundane is done then the fun begins.Each ornament that adorns the tree has a story to tell about my grandparents, parents or me.

  • Southville farmer wins big at state fair

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    Salathiel H. Snider of Shelby County won several highly placed tobacco awards at the 2010 Kentucky State Fair.

  • WICHE: Cranberry bogs bring in the harvest

    Did you know that the cranberry used to be called the “craneberry?”

    When the colonists first learned of this berry from their American Indian hosts in the New World they thought the blooms of the native shrub looked liked the long neck and bill of the crane. Eventually, as language goes, it was shortened to cranberry.

  • Barn art

    What better place for a tree with red and green leaves than Red Orchard Park?

    Even better, this tree really stands out because it’s nailed to a barn.

    How is that, you ask?

    The tree is a quilt pattern adorning a barn just inside the park’s entrance.

    The Kentucky Cover Lovers Quilt Guild, which encompasses seven counties, designed and constructed the quilt, which was hung on the barn on Nov. 4.

  • WICHE: Plant garlic now for 2011 summer harvest

    For most of us, garlic has become a cooking staple. You can give anything flavor by adding a little garlic to the recipe, and you can grow it yourself if you have a little space in the back yard.

    For centuries garlic has been enjoyed for its culinary, medicinal and spiritual qualities, including fending off evil spirits and vampires and acting as an anti-bacterial.