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Agriculture

  • WICHE: Controlling insects on indoor plants

    Have you noticed a sticky substance on the floor beneath your ficus or philodendron? Are there little scabs on the under side of the leaves of your orchid? Maybe you have noticed that your plants just look a little lack luster.
    Well, we can blame some plant puniness on being a tropical houseplant indoors in Kentuckiana during the winter.
    Low levels of humidity and low levels of light trigger a response in plants that slows them down for the winter. They shed foliage and basically standby until the environment turns more favorable.

  • Ag Report: Jan. 21, 2011

    Winter CoverAll Dairy Series
    to stop in Shelby County

    A stop in Shelby County is part of this year’s Winter CoverAll Dairy Series, sponsored by the Kentucky Dairy Development Council and Alltech, which got under way Thursday in Lincoln County and will tour around the state for a half-dozen sessions.
    Shelby County will be the final stop on the tour, with a session scheduled for Feb. 24 at the Shelby County Extension Office.

  • Stallion auction sign-up shows Saddlebred business improving

    Wendy Johnson of Copper Coin Farm in Simpsonville says the economy is “starting to make a pretty good turn in the Saddlebred community.”
    That is good news for the organizers of the annual All American Cup Stallion Review and Auction, a daylong event that begins at 7 a.m., Saturday at Claudia Sanders Dinner House in Shelbyville.
    There will be three tour buses to transport potential bidders to Sunrise Stables in Versailles and Alliance Stud and Copper Coin farms in Simpsonville.
    “Attendance is up from last year,” Johnson says.

  • WICHE: The snow isn’t all bad, but watch out for the salt

    As I write, I am comforted by the snow that has accumulated on the boughs of my Nordmann fir and Serbian spruce. It is beautiful, yes, but more important the snow serves as an insulator against desiccating winds and frigid temperatures.
    We must not forget that evergreens, particularly broadleaf evergreens like rhododendrons and American hollies, lose a great deal of moisture through their leaves in the winter.
    Winter desiccation is not unusual, but the effects are magnified coming out of a season of drought.

  • WICHE: From the pages of ‘The Old Farmers Almanac’

    So what does The Old Farmer’s Almanac say about 2011? Even if you don’t follow this sort of prognostication there are some interesting observations based in a little fact and a little myth.
    Here are a few of my favorites that may explain a bit more about nature as we enter into another year:

  • Kentucky Ag Report: Jan. 7, 2011

    San-N-Tone kicks off
    2011 series Sunday

    San-N-Tone Ranch in Simpsonville will host its first Horse Show Series event of 2011 on Sunday.
    The event will begin at 9 a.m. at the Shelby County Fair Grounds’ indoor arena.
    Events also are scheduled for Feb. 6 and March. 6.
    Entries closed on Thursday and will do so on the Thursdays before future events.
    For more information call Sandy Stewart (502-241-1262 or 722-9330) or E-mail SANNTONESHOW@yahoo.com.

    Crop assistance starts Monday

  • WICHE: Resist temptation to continue bad habits

    We all have bad habits. Some people chew their fingernails; others mow their grass too short in the summer. You can guess which one bugs me the most.
    The odd thing about many of the worst bad habits in the garden is that they have become so commonplace. The worst offenses are repeated everywhere to the extent that gardeners think they are the rule.
    Over-mulching, for example, has been an epidemic problem for many years despite the fact that research spells out trouble for our plants when we bury their roots under a foot of hardwood mulch.

  • Kentucky Ag Report: Dec. 31, 2010

    Crop assistance
    requests start Jan. 10

  • WICHE: Best books 2010

    I like a book that tells a story while teaching me a little something along the way.  I like when the writer’s personality is revealed in their prose, and I like when a book makes me feel like I am not the only one that marvels at what nature and people can do.
    Here are my 2010 picks for just this sort of thing:

  • WICHE: Holiday spices from tropical plants

    Considering how the quest for exotic spice fueled exploration around the world in the 15th century, it is no wonder that our favorite holiday flavors herald from around the world.

    From Southwest India to Southeast Asia we find cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and mace.