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Agriculture

  • WICHE: The heat is on vegetables – and here are some tips

    I can’t believe this heat already! I was hopeful that this summer was not going to be a repeat of last, but it looks like we are on track for some serious heat this summer.

    Some vegetables will surely respond to temperatures in the 90s…some will be good and some will be bad.

    I know we can’t change the ambient air temperature on a 90-degree day, but we can provide some shade for our plants on the hottest days of the summer with reasonable results.

  • Ag Report: June 3, 2011

    SCHS junior to attend

    Farm Bureau program

    Rachel White of Shelby County High School is one of 89 high school juniors from 57 counties chosen to attend Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 26thannual Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders this summer.

  • WICHE: Powdery mildew in the garden

    Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around, and it is not too terribly picky about where it spreads.

    It likes humid weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started. The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing, pruning and treatment before it spreads.

    Powdery mildew is caused by several different fungi. I won’t bore you with their names because they all act the same way.

  • Q&A: Here’s the scoop on using manure in the garden

     

    Q: I have access to alpaca manure. Can it be used in the garden? Michele

  • Continuing rains cause farmers problems that will mount

    Severe weather has kept Kentuckians running for basements all spring, but blown down trees and barns and damaged homes aren't the only problems they're facing.

    Farmers across the county have been battling damp soil and standing water as they try to find time to get crops in the ground.

  • Ag Report: May 27, 2011

    Deadlines this week

    for FSA programs

    Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency Executive Director John McCauley reminds farmers and landowners that they have until Wednesday to enroll their farms in the 2011 Direct and Counter-cyclical Program (DCP) and the Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) Program. More than 75 percent of an expected 1.7 million farms have already enrolled.

  • WICHE: Some plants like it wet

    There are some plants that demand good drainage: taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few.

    I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden but now that I know where water is slow to drain I now where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments.

    There is an up side to poor drainage for some plants. Just be sure that water is available when Mother Nature doesn’t deliver.

  • Horse owners alerted: Prepare for West Nile

    The rain continued to fall this week – at least not as hard as it has – but all that does is add to two huge concerns for summer: more mosquitoes and a much greater threat of West Nile Virus infecting horses.

    For that reason, the state department of agriculture earlier this week issued an alert to horse owners to be prepared for a greater threat of the virus, which has in the past decade infected hundreds of horses and killed 137.

  • Ag Report: May 20, 2011

    Shelby farmers eligible

    for federal disaster loans

    Shelby County is among those slated as contiguous to the 14 in Kentucky declared federal disaster areas, and its farm families are eligible to qualify for FSA EM loans.

    President Obama declared disaster areas because of damages and losses caused by severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding that occurred starting April 26. They included Oldham County.

  • WICHE: How to deal with carpenter bees and ants

    The carpenter bees are doing a number on our house! We perfectly fit the profile of a desirable place to lay your eggs for this rather docile bee, and they are busy around the frame of the garage as I write. I do have a plan.

    Carpenter bees are essentially harmless. The male, who hovers about, has no stinger. The female tunnels and lays her eggs. When she does come out, you would have to handle her for her to sting.

    I’ve never been stung by one and they sort of become acquaintances, because they are always there hovering about.