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Agriculture

  • EARLIER: Shelby County winners at Kentucky State Fair, Aug. 26, 2011

    Bees And Honey
    Open Class
    Four 1lb. Containers of Light
    1. Rebecca Collier, Shelbyville
    Four 2lb. Containers of Light
    2. Rebecca Collier, Shelbyville
    Youth Division
    Three 1lb. Containers of Amber
    1. Ally Ormsby, Shelbyville
    Sweepstakes
    1. Ally Ormsby, Shelbyville
    Honey Cookery
    Honey Nut Bread
    3. Jeanne Kemper, Bagdad
    Loaf White Bread made with
    3. Jeanne Kemper, Bagdad
    Whole Wheat Bread
    3. Jeanne Kemper, Bagdad
    Light Rolls, 1/2 dozen

  • WICHE: Stinging caterpillars lurking in the garden

    I just got a call from a reader in Taylorsville who was seeking an ID on a pest that was stinging her in the blackberry patch. She described the offender in very human terms….It looked like it was wearing glasses, had a green jacket on, little ears, etc.

    I could see the saddleback stinging caterpillar in my mind’s eye as she continued.

  • Ag Report: Aug. 19, 2011

    Ag officials involved

    in State Fair activities

     

  • WICHE: Sawflies are species specific – but you see many varieties

    One of the very first insects that I identified as a young gardener was the pine sawfly.  We had planted more than a hundred white pine seedlings some 30 years ago, and after a decade or so we started to lose a couple each year to one problem or another.

    I was charged with inspection duty: looking for and plucking bagworms; collecting beetles in jars for identification at the County Extension Service; or closely noting the color, legs and chewing habits of the various caterpillars I encountered.

  • Ag Report: Aug. 12, 2011

    4-H displays at state fair

    will have lots of competition

    At the Kentucky State Fair 4-H members from across the state showcase their talents in speeches, demonstrations and judging competitions in the West Hall of the Kentucky Exposition Center. Visitors can view more than 5,000 projects on display that encompass a variety of skills and hobbies including textiles, horticulture and arts and crafts.

  • WICHE: Uneven corn is caused by spotty pollination

    Corn has been a staple food for centuries. It was first cultivated by Indian people in Central America. In fact, the adoption of agriculture and the art of cultivating gave way to the grand cities of the Aztec and Mayans.

    What would the world be without corn and potatoes, both of which were first cultivated in Central America?

  • 22nd Shelbyville Horse Show: Big crowd closes show in big way

    The Shelbyville Fairgrounds was bursting at its seams with people on Saturday night, closing night of the 22nd annual Shelbyville Horse Show.

    Horse Show Manager R.H. Bennett said before the first day of the show even began that he was worried about the attendance rate this year because of the weather and economy.

    But apparently neither the muggy temperatures nor the down-and-out financial picture stopped people from attending the social event of the year in the Saddlebred Capital of the World.

  • Ag Report: Aug. 5, 2011

    Simpsonville resident

    joins angus association
    Carrie T. Jacoby of Simpsonville is a new junior member of the American Angus Association.

  • WICHE:Striped cucumber beetle spreads virus

    I continue to stand by my belief that I am my best defense in the garden.

    In the morning I go out and inspect my garden and smash insects and pick off diseased foliage, careful not to spread it to other plants by my own hand. I watch for the beginning of any abnormality and nip it in the bud.

    However, sometimes things slide by undetected, plus it is hard to determine bacterial brown spot from mosaic if you are not sure what you are looking for.

  • Weather is peachy for some produce

    Better late than never: That's been the motto for vegetable farmers this year.

    The heavy spring rains left fields too muddy to plant at normal times, but crops are still pouring in.

    "The rain really postponed our early planting, but the result has been maturity dates coming later," said Mary Courtney who runs Courtney Farms in Bagdad with her husband, Shane. "For instance, we just started harvesting tomatoes this year, while last year we were harvesting them at the end of June."