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Agriculture

  • Horse owners alerted: Prepare for West Nile

    The rain continued to fall this week – at least not as hard as it has – but all that does is add to two huge concerns for summer: more mosquitoes and a much greater threat of West Nile Virus infecting horses.

    For that reason, the state department of agriculture earlier this week issued an alert to horse owners to be prepared for a greater threat of the virus, which has in the past decade infected hundreds of horses and killed 137.

  • Ag Report: May 20, 2011

    Shelby farmers eligible

    for federal disaster loans

    Shelby County is among those slated as contiguous to the 14 in Kentucky declared federal disaster areas, and its farm families are eligible to qualify for FSA EM loans.

    President Obama declared disaster areas because of damages and losses caused by severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding that occurred starting April 26. They included Oldham County.

  • WICHE: How to deal with carpenter bees and ants

    The carpenter bees are doing a number on our house! We perfectly fit the profile of a desirable place to lay your eggs for this rather docile bee, and they are busy around the frame of the garage as I write. I do have a plan.

    Carpenter bees are essentially harmless. The male, who hovers about, has no stinger. The female tunnels and lays her eggs. When she does come out, you would have to handle her for her to sting.

    I’ve never been stung by one and they sort of become acquaintances, because they are always there hovering about.

  • Ag Report: May 13, 2011

    Weather-caused livestock

    deaths may generate aid

  • Q&A: Candidates for Agriculture Commissioner

    There are seven candidates for the Commissioner of Agriculture: James Comer (R), Robert Farmer (D), Stewart Gritton (D), John Lackey (D), Rob Rothenburger (R), David Williams (D), and BD Wilson (D). The Kentucky Agriculture Report collected responses on key issues from all candidates but Democrat David Williams. Here are their responses based on the order provided.

     

    What do you see as the role of the Agriculture Commissioner in the state?

  • WICHE: Amending the garden and feeding the soil

    The rules on amending the soil have changed over the years.

    Part of the change relates to the fact that good soil is hard to come by in newly developed subdivisions where enormous earth moving equipment is used to level trees and land.

    This equipment not only removes the valuable topsoil, it also compacts subsoil and kills the living organisms that make up a healthy soil system.

    The less we disturb the soil the better, but for many the reality is bleak that some sort of amendment is necessary in order to improve tilth, drainage and nutrition.

  • Cornerstone Christian Academy goes back to the farm with corn crop, ag day

    Cornerstone Christian Academy is getting into the farming business.

    An idea by board member Ray Tucker has led the school to have not only its first Ag Day for students on Tuesday but also to plant the school’s unused 17 acres on Frankfort Road in crops that can in the traditional agricultural manner help support the school.

    Tucker, who with his wife, Stephanie, owns Tucker Farms, has two children who attend Cornerstone, and he recently was voted vice chairman of the board.

  • Ag Report: May 6, 2011

    Hay Day seeks to make

    hay on various fronts

    North Central Hay Day, which seeks to broaden perspectives of producers within the hay industry, will be held May 12 at the Henry County Fair Grounds in Eminence.

    This event is sponsored by Chris McBurney, 37, owner and operator of McBurney Livestock Equipment. During this event, a demonstration of baling hay will be done on hay ground that was donated by Bobby Foree, a Henry County resident.

  • WICHE: Too much water can swamp some plants

    Unless you are cultivating cranberries or rice, all this rain is likely thwarting your spring gardening plans. It sure is for many farmers in our area, which is my primary concern.

    While perspective is important in these matters, many homeowners may see a little stress in their landscapes as a result of over a week of soaking rain.

    So how does excessive precipitation effect plants? Well, in every way possible.

  • Ag Report: April 29, 2011

    Kentucky celebrates

    its large beef industry
    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer says the beef industry is very important to Kentucky.

    “Kentucky’s beef industry gives us all a reason to celebrate throughout the year,” Farmer said. “Beef is an important part of a healthy, well-balanced diet. The beef industry also is a major driver of Kentucky’s economy.