.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • WICHE: A tale of ghosts, bogies and turnips?

    It looks like this late turnip crop is going to be an exceptional one. I will likely have some ready to harvest in honor of Halloween this year, too, which is quite apropos.

    What does the turnip have to do with Halloween you may ask? Well, they just may be more authentic than that pumpkin in the porch!

     The pumpkins have been for sale for weeks, and children have decided on costumes. But somewhere in the middle of it all is the story of All Hallow’s Eve.

  • Ag Report: Oct. 21, 2011

    USDA announces fall deadline

    for conservation programs

  • WICHE: Bulbs – tulips – don’t always shine like we want

    When it comes to bulbs, we don’t always meet with consistent success. And, before you blame the chipmunks, the guy who mows the grass or the bulb company for their lack-luster performance, consider some of the other factors that influence how well flowering bulbs flower.

    Sunlight, crowded bulbs, pre-mature removal of foliage the previous season, or a winter rest period that wasn’t cold enough or long enough may play a role in poor performance.

    The life cycle of a bulb is different than other herbaceous perennials.

  • WICHE: Plan garlic now for 2012 summer harvest

    For centuries garlic has been enjoyed for its culinary, medicinal and spiritual qualities, including fending off evil spirits and vampires and acting as an anti-bacterial.

    There was evidence of garlic in King Tut’s tomb when it was discovered so obviously the ancient Egyptians were growing it as far back as 2100 B.C. That’s some serious culinary history.

    There are two categories of garlic to consider: Allium sativum, or softneck garlic, and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic.

  • Ag Report: Oct. 14, 2011

    Horses being added

    to Kentucky Proud

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the Kentucky Equine Education Project and the Kentucky Horse Council announced that horses have been added to the Kentucky Proud program.

  • Ag Report: Oct. 7, 2011

    Conservation program

    launches sign-up period

    Conservation Farm Bill programs are in effect, and there are programs that could be of benefit to producers in Shelby County.

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is encouraging landowners, farmers and producers to visit their local NRCS office now to receive more information and apply for conservation technical assistance and possible financial funding opportunities.

  • WICHE: Chinese chestnuts ready for harvest

    As the vegetable garden winds to an end, I turn my harvest chores to the figs, persimmons and Chinese chestnuts.

    Our nut grove is now a sheep pasture, which is prefect for them because they have pasture and shade from all sorts of nut trees. As it turns out, it looks like my ewes and I share a favorite in the Chinese chestnut.

    After they eat their daily grain ration, they snack on chestnuts that have fallen to the ground. 

  • Ag Report: Sept. 30, 2011

    CAIP grant application

    deadline is next Friday

    Deadline for Phase I of the Shelby County Community Agriculture Investment Program is next Friday. That’s when agricultural producers in the county must  submit applications for grants through the Shelby County Extension Office.

  • WICHE: Naturalize the landscape with colorful sumacs

    You probably have noticed them in early fall along roadsides in Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The red, orange and purple color of the sumacs usually begins to show up earlier than others and it usually hangs around a little longer, too.

    You would be hard-pressed to come up with a plant genus that is better for fall color than the sumacs. Whether you’re a flameleaf, staghorn or smooth sumac, fall color is your middle name.

  • Ag Report: Sept. 23, 2011

    Bitzer’s cow recognized
    by Gelbvieh organization

    Tyler Bitzer of Shelbyville recently was recognized by the American Gelbvieh Association as being the owner of a cow that has exhibited the consistent maternal efficiency of the breed. The AGA designated his cow as a Dam of Merit and Dam of Distinction.