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Agriculture

  • Ag Report: Dec. 16, 2011

    Southern States holding its

    local annual meeting today

    Southern States Cooperative will review its operations at its local annual meeting today at the facility on 623 South 7th St. in Shelbyville. Events will begin at 11 a.m., with membership day activities and follow with the business meeting at 1 p.m.

    Management will report on local and company-wide operations, as well as projected budget results for next year. Local elections will be held.

  • WICHE: Mistletoe evident in tree tops

    I like the winter landscape because I can see past the green canvas of summer into neighboring fields, where horses graze and a pet cow that is almost as old as me slumbers.

    I can see mistletoe everywhere, too, driving down the interstate, walking in the park, sitting at a traffic light. It is there if you look into the canopies of trees devoid of their leafy-ness. We are obviously not the first to notice round globs of greenery nestled in tree tops.

  • Ag Report: Dec. 9, 2011

    Veteran Green County farmer

    honored as 2011 best in state

    Jim Sidebottom, a 55-year farming veteran of Green County, was honored as the 2011 Kentucky Farm Bureau “Farmer of the Year” during the organization’s 92nd annual meeting in Louisville.

    Jere Cannon of Fleming County and Craig Roberts of Caldwell County were the other finalists also considered for this award.

  • WICHE: African violets bloom indoors year round

    One of a few sure things in my life is that I can keep my African violets in bloom year round!

    Many complain that after the first flush of blooms fades the only thing left is a year’s worth of fuzzy foliage. Well, with a little attention you can keep your African violet cycling in and out of bloom all year round. African violets are easier to grow then many think if you create a favorable growing environment

  • Ag Report: Dec. 2, 2011

    Beekeeping group offers

    essay contest for 4-H

    The topic for the 2012 beekeeping essay, sponsored by the Foundation for the Preservation of Honey Bees Inc., is “The results of honey bee pollination in my community.” Active 4-H members can compete to win three awards, at amounts of $750, $500 or $250. Entrants are encouraged to consider the scope of plants, food crops, trees, habitats and animals that are positively affected by honeybee pollination.

  • WICHE: Pick poinsettias at their peak

    I seriously cannot believe it is December! It is time to start decorating for the holidays, which includes the poinsettia.

    The poinsettia has been a fixture in American homes as a holiday decoration for as long as most of us can remember. I think it is fair to say that it is considered the “official” Christmas flower. In fact the U.S. Census Bureau says that more than 75 million plants were sold last holiday season!

  • Some tips on preparing, handling horses in winter

    Preparing horses for the arrival of winter involves many of the same tasks done for humans: Drag out the winter clothes, check to see if heater is working, guard against frozen pipes, stock the pantry and make sure shots are up to date for the cold-and-flu season.

    The first forecast of possible snow is signaling the imminent arrival of winter, and horse operations are scrambling to get the local equine population under wraps.

  • Ag Report: Nov. 25, 2011

    NAILE champions sale

    breaks $100,000 plateau

    The Sale of Champions at the North American International Livestock Exposition broke the $100,000 plateau for the first time in its history.  

    Gross sales for six animals this year is $103,500, breaking the previous record of $98,900 set in 2009.  Six animals, three Grand Champions and three Reserve Champions, are sold each year.

  • Business Q&A: Ferenc Vegh

  • WICHE: Checklist for preparing for winter: Part II

    Several years ago I made the mistake of leaving the water pump in the barn instead of storing it in the basement. Well, I found out why Daddy always stored it in the basement during the cold days of winter.

    When I got the pump out to do some irrigation the following summer, the primer tank had split right open. A little bit of moisture was left in the tank, and it froze. The tank is made of cast iron, so imagine what a little moisture might do to your favorite terracotta pot.