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Agriculture

  • Ag Report: Dec. 2, 2011

    Beekeeping group offers

    essay contest for 4-H

    The topic for the 2012 beekeeping essay, sponsored by the Foundation for the Preservation of Honey Bees Inc., is “The results of honey bee pollination in my community.” Active 4-H members can compete to win three awards, at amounts of $750, $500 or $250. Entrants are encouraged to consider the scope of plants, food crops, trees, habitats and animals that are positively affected by honeybee pollination.

  • WICHE: Pick poinsettias at their peak

    I seriously cannot believe it is December! It is time to start decorating for the holidays, which includes the poinsettia.

    The poinsettia has been a fixture in American homes as a holiday decoration for as long as most of us can remember. I think it is fair to say that it is considered the “official” Christmas flower. In fact the U.S. Census Bureau says that more than 75 million plants were sold last holiday season!

  • Some tips on preparing, handling horses in winter

    Preparing horses for the arrival of winter involves many of the same tasks done for humans: Drag out the winter clothes, check to see if heater is working, guard against frozen pipes, stock the pantry and make sure shots are up to date for the cold-and-flu season.

    The first forecast of possible snow is signaling the imminent arrival of winter, and horse operations are scrambling to get the local equine population under wraps.

  • Ag Report: Nov. 25, 2011

    NAILE champions sale

    breaks $100,000 plateau

    The Sale of Champions at the North American International Livestock Exposition broke the $100,000 plateau for the first time in its history.  

    Gross sales for six animals this year is $103,500, breaking the previous record of $98,900 set in 2009.  Six animals, three Grand Champions and three Reserve Champions, are sold each year.

  • Business Q&A: Ferenc Vegh

  • WICHE: Checklist for preparing for winter: Part II

    Several years ago I made the mistake of leaving the water pump in the barn instead of storing it in the basement. Well, I found out why Daddy always stored it in the basement during the cold days of winter.

    When I got the pump out to do some irrigation the following summer, the primer tank had split right open. A little bit of moisture was left in the tank, and it froze. The tank is made of cast iron, so imagine what a little moisture might do to your favorite terracotta pot.

  • WICHE: Checklist for preparing garden for winter: Part I

    There are many gardening tasks that must be done – or are better to be done – in the fall of the year, things like cleaning up old plant material; fertilizing trees, shrubs and lawns; and protecting tender plants like hybrid tea roses and French hydrangeas.

    These chores are all a part of garden maintenance and taking care of them now will improve the quality of your garden later. Here’s a checklist to remind you of what needs to be done to get the garden ready for winter.

     

    Clean-up

  • Ag Report: Nov. 11, 2011

    NAILE show continues

    at state fairgrounds

    Thousands of animals, Quarter Horse roundups, youth in agriculture and a giant country store for shopping are part of the North American International Livestock Show, which continues through Friday at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville.

  • WICHE: Prune brambles now to keep fruit growing

    It’s time to clean up the bramble patch. In order to maintain healthy and productive blackberries and raspberries, we need to prune out the old to make room for the new.

    Most brambles are biennial, which means they fruit on second-year growth.

    Blackberries are easy to deal with, just remove the arching canes that fruited this year and trim up and trellis the new growth from this summer, which will bear next summer’s fruit. Repeat the same thing next year.

    Biennial raspberries are trickier.

  • Ag Report: Nov. 4, 2011

    SCHS alum Jenkins

    earns FFA degree

    Debra Jenkins, daughter of David and Dana Jenkins of Pleasureville, recently received the American FFA Degree at the National FFA meeting in Indianapolis.

    Jenkins graduated from Shelby County High School and served as president of the SCHS FFA chapter.

    Now a student at Murray State University, she received the highest degree awarded by the organization, one of 146 Kentucky members to receive the degree this year.