.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • Cool season has slowed spring

    I want to say spring has sprung, but it hasn’t.

    I have 160 Freedom Ranger chicks coming in the mail next week and lambs hitting the ground – don’t worry, that’s shepherd talk for lambs being born. I want warm not just for the new 2-legged and 4-legged arrivals but also for my potatoes, onions and kale. I need warm before I can even think of putting a tomato, bean or cucumber out in the garden.

  • Some azaleas thrive in full sun

    Did you know that azaleas and rhododendrons are essentially the same thing?

    They are both members of the rhododendron genus; they have similar blooms and similar cultural requirements.  Some say the primary difference between the two is the number of pollen-bearing stamens – rhododendron have 10 or more per flower and azaleas have only five. 

  • As weather dries, it’s time to start potatoes

    Spring break from teaching at UofL falls conveniently during the week of St. Patrick’s Day, which is also my target date for planting onions and potatoes. I typically manage a mid-March planting, but the condition of the soil has held me up a bit this year. I will not start digging until the soil dries out and is considered workable.

  • We have been skunked again

    From time to time I see a skunk meandering around the farm during the day. It’s unusual, however. A few years back there was one that was sniffing about under some pines in the lower pasture, and it was evident from its movements and from its awareness (or lack thereof) of its surroundings that this creature knew it had the advantage.

    A skunk’s eyesight is poor, so sneaking up on him to get a photograph was possible, but it made me realize that startling a skunk is probably not a good idea.

  • WICHE: Seed starting indoors helps early season crops

    I have my orders placed for onion sets and seed potatoes along with some of my favorite summer crops that will be directly seeded in the garden once the temperatures really warm.…I can barely stand the wait! I have just seeded out several trays of early season vegetables that like a cool start to the season. Kale, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts are just beginning to push through the light potting mix.

  • Shelby business is creating a buzz with its saw

    The Triple S Planning Commission is embroiled in a lawsuit with Bagdad Lumber Sawmill & Kiln about the company’s ability to operate as is at its location at 2932 Christiansburg Road in Bagdad.

    His mill is located on a parcel zoned Agriculture, which Triple S officials say isn’t appropriate for this business.

    But owner/operator Ron Harris claims in his suit that he had approval before opening the doors to his company. The courts will decide, and while they are, Harris is able to continue work while the courts decided the lawsuit.

  • WICHE: Orchard care starts now

    As summer fruit begins to ripen, or should I say rot, the calls start coming in. Home orchardists in Kentuckiana are at wits end as they watch their apples, peaches and pears do little more than fall from the tree in a spotted, bruised or petrified state.

  • WICHE: Snow pack leaves evidence of wildlife

    The other day, 4:30 p.m., after shedding my city boots for my country boots I head back out the door with my egg basket and a jug off water. Our two livestock guardian, dogs by my side, and I head back to the barn.

    In the blink of an eye Baxter and Finca take off in full defense mode towards our hens and the barn. Baxter takes the front and Finca takes the back. And, to my bewilderment, a beautiful coyote is flushed from beyond and the dogs follow pursuit. Wiley coyote hits the frozen lake, and the dogs circle.

  • WICHE: Ice-laden branches need attention

    The 2009 January ice storm knocked down limbs, electricity and phone service across Kentucky. The damage to trees was astounding, to say the least.

    Last week’s icy “situation” brought back the memory of those dread-filled days as we slowly tackled the clean-up effort at the farm. This year’s ice is not nearly as bad as 2009, but it sure left a mess in its wake. If you are among those with heavy damage assess the situation with an eye towards safety, first, and foremost.

  • Weather slows Shelby's farmers but can’t stop them

    As winter storms continue to blanket the area in snow and ice and temperatures drop into the single – and sometimes lower – digits, many farmers in Shelby County are trying to use their time wisely.

    There are plans to be set for when warmer weather hits and this season’s crops need to be planted, there are tractors and combines and bailers to repair, and budgets need to be examined before it’s time to order seeds.